1. Allan Feldman
  2. https://www.usf.edu/education/faculty/faculty-profiles/allan-feldman.aspx
  3. Professor
  4. IRES Track I: US-Ghana Collaboration: Providing Opportunities for Global Research on Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
  5. https://www.usf.edu/nsf-ires/
  6. University of South Florida
  1. Sarina Ergas
  2. http://cee.eng.usf.edu/faculty/sergas/
  3. Professor
  4. IRES Track I: US-Ghana Collaboration: Providing Opportunities for Global Research on Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
  5. https://www.usf.edu/nsf-ires/
  6. University of South Florida
  1. Kebreab Ghebremichael
  2. Professor
  3. IRES Track I: US-Ghana Collaboration: Providing Opportunities for Global Research on Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
  4. https://www.usf.edu/nsf-ires/
  5. University of South Florida
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 4, 2020 | 09:37 p.m.

    We hope you will enjoy viewing our video. Our project is funded by. NSF International Research Experiences for Students. Each summer we are taking five US undergraduate and graduate students to Ghana to work on research projects related to water and sanitation. This video is about the US students' work with Ghanaian high school students and their teachers on an authentic scientific research activity on the use of biosand filters. You may want to check out our website for more information: https://www.usf.edu/nsf-ires/

  • May 8, 2020 | 04:27 a.m.

    I have a long-time interest in science education and water in Ghana. (For example, an article I wrote many years ago for New Scientist entitled "Eyes on the Volta Lake.").  We have a faculty member at Wayne State focused on Ghana studies (Jennifer Hart:  https://clasprofiles.wayne.edu/profile/eu0767); you might have some cooperative opportunities with her.  Do you plan to attend the Ghana Studies Association conference scheduled for July, 2021 in Tamale? [wonder if that will be affected by COVID-19].  I hope to attend to renew/review some of my observations from years ago. 

  • May 8, 2020 | 04:43 a.m.

    Regarding citizen-based water testing: have you considered the use of 3M Petrifilm plates?  See our research on this method for citizen-based water testing:  Vail, J.H., Morgan, R., Merino, C.R., Gonzales, F, Miller, R., and Ram, J.L. Enumeration of waterborne Escherichia coli using Petrifilm plates:  Comparison to standard methods.  Env. Quality. 32: 368-373,  2003.  An Africa-centric application of the technique, designed for use where electricity or an incubator may not be available has been described by Metcalf and Polinelli in several abstracts at the American Society for Microbiology, but never published in peer-review, as far as I can tell.  If you want more information about this, contact me.

  • Icon for: Sarina Ergas

    Sarina Ergas

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 04:51 p.m.

    Hi Jeff - I am the Environmental Engineering co-PI.  I actually had a MS student who was a Peace Corps volunteer in Madagascar who did some comparisons between different methods for E. coli enumeration.  The petrifilm plates were compact and easy to use even for field workers with little training.  3M was also very generous with discounts.  However, we had difficulty in getting down to the lower detection levels we needed for drinking water.  She tried to modify the plates with a filter pad but I don't think she was ever happy with the results.  I had heard that 3M has made some changes in their method so maybe we should take another look.  I have in my "to do" list for our next trip to Ghana to take some plates along.  

  • May 10, 2020 | 11:17 a.m.

    Sarina:  The Petrifilm plates work well for environmental monitoring, where the counts of interest are (depending on local regulations) on the order of 100 to 300 cfu/100 mL.  Drinking water, which requires <1 cfu/100 mL is beyond the capabilities of the system.  Using a supplementary filtration step sort of defeats the purpose of the simplicity.  We have a method that we've used for another project that employs two syringes and a syringe filter and doesn't require modification of the Petrifilm plate that might work to enhance the sensitivity to the level needed for drinking water.  Write to me directly by email if you are interested in discussing further.

  • Icon for: Alison Heimowitz

    Alison Heimowitz

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 11:30 a.m.

    Interesting collaboration! I'm wondering who identified the need for this project - local villagers in Ghana or students in the US? Did the research project actually translate into safe, potable water in local villages?  

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2020 | 11:54 a.m.

    I had the same questions, Alison, thank you!

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 03:13 p.m.

    The initial connection was between Kebreab Ghebremichael (USF) and Richard Buamah (KNUST). They did work together on removing high levels of fluoride from groundwater using biosand filters. I have done work on engaging K-12 students and their teachers in authentic scientific research.

  • Icon for: Amanda Gunning

    Amanda Gunning

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 5, 2020 | 03:28 p.m.

    I love the connection between the US students and the HS students and teachers in Ghana, as well as the real implications the work has on the community there. Thank you for sharing such great work!

  • May 6, 2020 | 01:54 a.m.

    Fascinating work.

    Which activities have been valuable in developing lifelong learners? What new ideas have the students contributed to the water purification challenge?

    Thank you,

    Marcia

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 6, 2020 | 01:19 p.m.

    The main contribution from the students has been the design of the BSF itself. We have a parallel project going on in Tampa and the high school students designed a BSF that is being used in a modified form for research at USF. The bench scale model that was used in Ghana was also developed in part along with the students. We were using them with schools in Tampa until they shut down because of the pandemic. We're in the process of putting together an article that will have more about the students' contribution to the research being done at USF.

  • Icon for: Kenne Dibner

    Kenne Dibner

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 11:45 a.m.

    Thanks for posting a great video! I'm wondering if you can share a little more about how you follow up with US students after they return home? How do they stay engaged and connected, and how are they encouraged to incorporate what they've learned into their work going forward?

     
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    Judi Fusco
  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 6, 2020 | 01:21 p.m.

    That hasn't been the strongest part of the project. We've had one cohort so far, which we're learning from. The second cohort will not be going to Ghana this summer because of the pandemic. However, we are meeting with them to prepare them, and some of the students from the first cohort are helping with preparing the second.

  • Icon for: Judi Fusco

    Judi Fusco

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 01:33 p.m.

    I'm curious how the undergrads become part of the project. What a fascinating, life changing experience!  Thank you for your video!

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 6, 2020 | 01:38 p.m.

    For the first cohort we recruited only from USF. We sent out information to students in the sciences, education, public health, and global sustainability. We also posted flyers around campus. For cohort 2 we did a national search through professional and research association listserves. We also did the local recruitiment.

     
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    Judi Fusco
  • Icon for: Judi Fusco

    Judi Fusco

    Facilitator
    May 10, 2020 | 01:35 p.m.

    Thanks!  

  • Icon for: Hiller Spires

    Hiller Spires

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 6, 2020 | 02:02 p.m.

    What a formative experience for everyone involved!

    I see many parallels in your project and ours, particularly in terms of empowering students to be change agents. Our research team has been working with K-12 students through an inquiry process called Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global to address enduring global challenges as enshrined in the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The cross-school collaboration featured in our video focuses on SDG 6 (Clean Water and Sanitation).

    We've observed that our students gain a deeper and more nuanced understanding of WaSH challenges when they examine these issues from a comparative standpoint, i.e., local and global contexts. Have you found this to be the case with the high school and university students engaged in your project as well?

  • Icon for: Hiller Spires

    Hiller Spires

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 6, 2020 | 03:01 p.m.

    For this particular grant, my co-PI, Erin Krupa, is math ed faculty. Our project manager, Cameron Good, is a science ed graduate student. @Marcia We've also worked with James and Tiffany in CS!  

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 6, 2020 | 02:08 p.m.

    We have good data from last year's high school students in Tampa that shows just that. We also have data from the USF students who went to Ghana. Unfortunately there was a mess up in our interviews of the Ghanaian students. Of course we have a ton of anecdotal data about how successful the project is for everyone. 

    Are you working with any of the science ed faculty at NC State?

  • May 6, 2020 | 02:13 p.m.

    Definitely. We work with Tiffany Barnes and James Lester among others.

    marcia

  • May 6, 2020 | 02:09 p.m.

    Thank you for your response. Fascinating. Our Knowledge Integration pedagogy emphasizes distinguishing ideas--very compatible with the local/global analysis that is successful in your work. It would be useful to delve more deeply into this convergence.

    Marcia

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 7, 2020 | 11:30 a.m.

    Yes, that sounds like a good idea. Do you have a particular piece of writing about it that you would recommend?

  • Icon for: Michael Rosenfeld

    Michael Rosenfeld

    VP of National Productions
    May 7, 2020 | 12:54 p.m.

    What a great project. Did you find that students completed the project with a greater interest in using their STEM education in the service of international development or solving global challenges? 

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 7, 2020 | 07:55 p.m.

    We had two types of students -- the USF students and the Ghanaian students. The USF students were selected because they had this interest to begin with. This experience strengthened their interest. For the Ghanaian students this was of immediate interest. Most of them used some type of onsite water treatment but not biosand filters. This increased their awareness of the pathogens that could still remain in their water. They were also very interested in the issue of fluoride removal because many knew people who suffered from fluorosis. 

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Judi Fusco
  • May 9, 2020 | 04:46 p.m.

     Allan, I'm surprised that, when I look at the map of where people have clicked into see your video that there are no viewers from Ghana.  In fact, no viewers from anywhere in Africa.  Do your Ghanaian students know about your video?  If I were you, I would encourage them to view it and to share it with their friends. I'm just saying...

    I'd love to see their comments about it.

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 9, 2020 | 08:32 p.m.

    Jeffrey - Thanks for the information about the Tamale conference and Jennifer Hart's work.

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 9, 2020 | 08:32 p.m.

    Hi Jeffrey - Thank you for your email. It made us aware that we had not informed any of our partners in Ghana about this showcase. I just sent the information to them.

    Allan

  • Icon for: Eric Hamilton

    Eric Hamilton

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2020 | 01:35 p.m.

    This is a great project.  The IC4 project in our video has some background in Ghana, though our current country slate in Africa involves Kenya, Nigeria, Cameroon, and Namibia.  If there is a way that the Ghanaian work might involve remote participation from other Africa countries, please let me know.  Either way, great project!

  • Icon for: Allan Feldman

    Allan Feldman

    Lead Presenter
    Professor
    May 12, 2020 | 03:15 p.m.

    Hi Allison - We didn't work with villages. The collaboration was between USF and the Kwame Nkurmah University of Science and Technology in Ghana. The video shows the work that our students did with high school students in their school in Ghana. The setting was Kumasi, which is the second largest city in Ghana. Our immediate goal for the Ghanaian high school students was to provide them to engage in authentic research about an issue that is of importance in Ghana. In doing so they gained knowledge about ways in which the water sources could be improved with biosand filters. 

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