Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

JENNIFER CARINCI

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  • Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 5, 2020 | 07:56 a.m.

    Welcome! Thanks so much for taking the time to view the video. Our ARISE - Advancing Research & Innovation in the STEM Education of Preservice Teachers in High-Need School Districts (ARISE) - work has just emerged in the past couple years, but builds off AAAS' long history supporting NSF's Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program. How can we collaborate to fill in gaps in our knowledge about how best to prepare and retain STEM teachers to work in high-need school districts? Consider adding your thoughts below and/or contacting us to share your research in a blog or other form with our ARISE network.

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    Simon Jones

    Informal Educator
    May 5, 2020 | 09:03 a.m.

    Superb video, very important subject and a strong narrative. Excellent.

  • Icon for: Nahid Nariman

    Nahid Nariman

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 02:03 p.m.

    Jennifer,

    It is good to see that the building blocks in encouraging students, especially the under-represented ones to STEM starts with knowledgable teachers. I agree that providing professional development and curriculum for these teachers is of great importance. 

    My questions is what have you done in terms of creating a community for these teachers to rely on when they need help and more guidance?

     

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 6, 2020 | 10:50 a.m.

    Nahid,


    I appreciate your engagement. The notion of knowledgeable teachers as the building block to an effective and diverse STEM workforce is certainly appropriate today on National Teacher Appreciation Day!


    ARISE is mostly around fostering research and evidence-based innovation in STEM teacher education (versus direct support to teachers). Therefore, we tend to influence through faculty engagement with our online resources (see our blog posts including STEM Professional Development That Works) or focused convenings. We co-host with NSF an in-person professional development event annually for teachers called the Noyce Summit, which provides both structured sessions and more informal networking to support STEM educators involved in NSF's Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program - higher education and pre- and in-service teachers. You can view materials from past Summits here. Many Noyce Principal Investigators are doing great work supporting teachers. You can view 16 other Noyce project videos in the Showcase.


    What have you found works well in creating a community for teachers?

  • Icon for: Nahid Nariman

    Nahid Nariman

    Researcher
    May 8, 2020 | 12:03 p.m.

    Jennifer,

    Thank you for your response. What a great way to approach teachers by proving online resources. What I have observed in the programs are mainly creating a place for teachers to share their opinions and strategies. I like your approach and will definitely review STEM Professional Development That Works site. Thank you for sharing.

  • May 5, 2020 | 04:39 p.m.

    Great work, Jennifer. High quality video, high quality data, important message to share. Our pre- and in-service teachers definitely find support in the very ecosystems that have been created through the Noyce program, and reading timely articles in the ARISE website have been very helpful.

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 6, 2020 | 07:40 a.m.

    Thanks for your kind words, support, and great work, Christine!

  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 10:53 p.m.

    What have been some of the main reasons found in this work that may help us understand why teachers remain and teachers leave the profession? If teacher preparation programs are an influence on future retention what can teacher prep programs do better (that might not be in place now) to promote induction and retention? And thanks! This was/is an important project!

  • Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 6, 2020 | 08:22 a.m.

    Thanks for the great questions, Ann!

    Fuller and Pendola (2019) found in their lit review that some of the main reasons (from studies focusing in-service) why teachers leave the profession include:

    • personal characteristics - teachers who are younger, less experienced ; eligible for retirement; women; or have a graduate degree are more likely to leave;
    • salary - as you might expect, has a negative relationship with attrition across the career continuum;
    •  school characteristics/working conditions - schools with lower achievement have higher attrition, though this may be largely driven by working conditions, as teachers perceptions of these have the strongest relationship with leaving (and on the flip side staying).

    To your second question, there has not been much research tying specific aspects of teacher preparation to what happens afterwards; in fact, my colleagues and I just published a book on this topic: Linking Teacher Preparation Program Design and Implementation to Outcomes for Teachers and Students. Without better data (on both aspects of prep programs and tracking of grads) and rigorous study design, your question and ultimately how best to prepare STEM teachers is difficult to fully answer. As you know, NSF's Noyce program, specifically Track 4: Research, has more recently been working to change this in the STEM arena by inviting proposals investigating STEM teacher effectiveness, retention, and persistence. (For readers interested in conducting research in these areas who may be unfamiliar with NSF Noyce Track 4: Research, you can learn more here.)

    In general, researchers (e.g., Boyd, Grossman, Ing, Lankford, Loeb, O'Brien, & Wycoff,  2011) have found that well-prepared teachers are less likely to turnover (move schools) or attrition (leave the profession). I think clinical experience is one area in particular in which prep programs can make a difference. Willson (2011) noted effective STEM programs characteristics including congruence between student teaching context and later school assignment. More recently researchers like Ronfeldt and Goldhaber have been doing exciting experimental designs looking at student achievement of cooperating teachers' students (as well as quality feedback) to probe further the positive effect a mentor's ability has in this area on the later results of mentee's students. Work from Ingersoll, as well as Fuller and Pendola's own original analysis of data in Texas that can be found in our commissioned paper, suggest that limited field experience may make teachers more likely to leave.

     

     
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    Ann Cavallo
  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 11:45 p.m.

    Agree with findings on significant preservice clinical teaching experiences as being so important! Thanks for the great (additional!) resources on the topic. I do also recall some research on administrative support (principals) being important. Definitely more research is needed. Thanks Jennifer!

  • Icon for: Hollylynne Lee

    Hollylynne Lee

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 08:54 a.m.

    Thank you so much for the focus on synthesizing literature on STEM teacher preparation, practices, and attrition/retention.  I have not read your papers (yet), but I am wondering if you found any differences in trends in any of the different disciplines (Science, Math, Technology, Engineering) or levels of education (elementary, middle, high).  In particular, many traditional career and technical education teacher preparation programs have transitioned to include a broader focus on engineering education in K-12 and advanced technologies such as robotics and biotech. SO I am wondering about literature coming from these different domain on teacher prep/practices/retention, and if there are notable differences.  Are there different domains in which we need more targeted research?

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 6, 2020 | 09:37 a.m.

    Thanks for addressing the need to disaggregate results by grade and discipline. Unfortunately, few studies have had sufficient focus or data to address these needed areas. Below are some examples of these gaps identified by our commissioned paper authors.

    Bell, Gitomer, Savage, and McKenna (2019) in their review of found a "paucity of research on STEM teacher educators" and called for a "deeper focus on the knowledge and beliefs of teachers of all types." Strikingly, these authors found NO studies between 2014 and 2017 addressing preparation of technology or engineering teachers published in the 14 peer-reviewed journals they included in their review.

    Youngs, Bieda, and Kim (2019) cited a weakness in the induction lit related to retention that they reviewed was that most focused on multiple-subject elementary teachers. Therefore, there was little on elementary teachers who only taught science or math or on secondary teachers in any of the STEM disciplines.

    Fuller and Pendola (2019) noted that the Texas data they analyzed did not identify engineering teachers (often classified as math) and difficulty identifying technology teachers due to the wide range of courses (sometimes classified as CTE or math) and therefore had to omit this group from their analysis.

    In short, you have hit on major areas for future research ripe for exploration.

     

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    Kavita Mittapalli

    Researcher
    May 6, 2020 | 10:15 a.m.

    Excellent overview of the book and papers, Jennifer. Looking forward to reading the new book soon. Thank you and congratulations.

     
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    Meltem Alemdar
  • Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 6, 2020 | 10:50 a.m.

    Much appreciated, Kavita! Glad to see evaluators like you and Meltem contributing to the discussion.

  • May 6, 2020 | 10:23 a.m.

    Great video, and very timely important project!. I think synthesizing the STEM teacher preparation literature is very important. I am wondering if anyone also studied the impact of the partnership between teacher preparation programs and the school districts on the retention. In my experience as an evaluator on some Noyce projects, it plays a huge rolefor preparing the teachers for the classrooms when the partnership is strong, and the preparation programs have a better idea of the schools' cultures, especially in high-need schools.

     
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    Jessica Gale
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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 6, 2020 | 11:25 a.m.

    So true, Meltem. The importance of mutually beneficial partnerships between prep programs and schools - especially for practical preparation to prepare teachers for the cultures in which they will teach and to address schools' needs and learn from perspectives on strengths/weakness for continuous improvement - cannot be understated. Since NCATE's Blue Ribbon Panel on Clinical Preparation, Partnerships, and Improved Learning, there has been increased attention to the role and importance of partnerships and lots of great examples from Noyce projects and other programs. However, I don't know that there has been as much intentional study of what works in these relationships in general and particularly for STEM teacher retention. Perhaps some participating in this event may be able to share their work or the work of others on this topic with us. Also seems like a good idea for a collaborative study . . .

  • May 6, 2020 | 11:27 a.m.

    Excellent video, Jennifer. I love the animations! I attended the ARISE meeting prior to last year's Noyce conference and enjoyed engaging with scholars around some of the major issues within the STEM teacher preparation literature. It's exciting to see how the project has developed and I can see this work being immensely valuable to STEM teachers and those working to support them. 

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 6, 2020 | 12:25 p.m.

    I am so glad you have found our Noyce work valuable, Jessica! Thanks for taking the time to provide your feedback. ARISE has certainly come a long way, and we still have more to go, and hope to do so collaboratively with individuals like you in our network. Please keep in touch with your work.

  • Icon for: Gay B Stewart

    Gay B Stewart

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2020 | 02:20 p.m.

    I am so pleased to see the fantastic results of ARISE, and hope this provides a roadmap to fill in the research gaps!

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 12, 2020 | 02:39 p.m.

    Thanks for your support, Gay!

  • Icon for: Iris Wagstaff

    Iris Wagstaff

    STEM Program Director
    May 7, 2020 | 12:13 a.m.

    Awesome video! As someone with expertise in K-12 STEM education research and policy we know the research says effective teachers are the greatest influence on student achievement and success. The ARISE initiative examines the factors that define  "effective" STEM teachers and those that impact retention and attrition. This work is greatly needed, as it focuses on pre-service teachers in high-needs school districts which raises critical issues of equity and access that need to be addressed.

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 7, 2020 | 11:22 a.m.

    Exactly, Iris. The stakes for students of having even one ineffective teacher, particularly in STEM, are too high to keep experimenting on teacher candidates and their future students without more evidence of what works, in what context, for whom.

  • Icon for: Beth Sappe

    Beth Sappe

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 01:48 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing the series of papers to examine the current state of STEM teacher retention and preparation. These papers will be helpful in the work we are doing in Baltimore City Public Schools to hire and retain STEM teachers in our district. I did not have the opportunity to read your research yet but wonder if there is a difference in your findings across different STEM subjects such as math or science.  Aligning strong partnerships with higher ed and K-12 school districts to develop strong ongoing mentorships and professional learning is so important and needed.

  • Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 7, 2020 | 02:12 p.m.

    As a former Baltimore City Public Schools teacher and someone who has conducted research and helped with hiring interviews in the District, I am thrilled that this work may be useful to you! In my response to Hollylynne above I listed some of the limitations our authors found in existing research or original analyses in disaggregating by STEM discipline and grade level. I can add that Youngs, Bieda, and Kim (2019)  went on to write, "One challenge in conducting experimental studies of beginning STEM teacher induction is attaining a sufficient number of novice secondary teachers in mathematics, science, engineering, and/or technology in order to carry out statistical analyses."

  • Icon for: Beth Sappe

    Beth Sappe

    Facilitator
    May 8, 2020 | 11:44 a.m.

    Thanks for the sharing Jennifer. I will be sure to take a look at the resource you shared as well as. I am always happy to see our former students and teachers still doing great work:) 

  • Icon for: Kat Fancher

    Kat Fancher

    Informal Educator
    May 7, 2020 | 04:20 p.m.

    This is a great video about much needed research! I find it so interesting that loosing good STEM teachers has a clear impact on the learning environment.

  • Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 7, 2020 | 05:33 p.m.

    Thanks for your kind note, Kat! We co-host an annual event with NSF that includes some time for pre- and in-service STEM teachers to visit resources in DC. We had a productive conversation with your Director, Carol O'Donnell, about bringing Noyce Scholars/Fellows to the Smithsonian Science Education Center. When we are able to do so again next summer, I think many will appreciate the English Learner resources I saw in your video.

  • Icon for: Sabrina Stanley

    Sabrina Stanley

    Graduate Student
    May 7, 2020 | 07:32 p.m.

    Great video production. Your focus fits alongside our NOYCE LIST project. This video does a great job of highlighting the existing problems for STEM education and describing necessary future research.

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 8, 2020 | 12:15 p.m.

    I also enjoy seeing the synergy with your video and others in the showcase. Feel free to contact me if you would like to chat further. Thanks for your encouragement, Sabrina.

  • May 8, 2020 | 04:09 a.m.

    I guess there's always going to be somebody with a critical or curious word:  I experienced cognitive dissonance in your video at time point 2:38 where you have two people shaking hands.  Why are they shaking with their left hands? [dissonance:  right hands are normally normative; these days, even shaking hands is discouraged].  Additional note: with my religious female Muslim students [and now just about everybody], no hand-shaking either.  We were elbow-knocking in my lab long before COVID-19.

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 9, 2020 | 09:34 a.m.

    Thanks for watching and for your constructive feedback, Jeffrey.

  • Icon for: DeeDee Wright

    DeeDee Wright

    Graduate Student
    May 8, 2020 | 12:13 p.m.

    I think the role of teachers in developing our next generation of STEM workers in clear. What I am wondering about it the role that STEM teachers play in recruiting future STEM teachers? When I hear students ask about careers in STEM or see posters depicting STEM jobs, a career in STEM education is often overlooked or missing completely.

  • Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 9, 2020 | 09:55 a.m.

    Interesting observation, DeeDee. I agree that STEM education is often overlooked in terms of STEM career options for young people. In fact, I tried to hint in the video at the role STEM teachers can play in inspiring their students to become STEM teachers by having one of the four of the students at the beginning grow up to be in the classroom at the end, educating his own students about STEM options. Many STEM teachers, as with other STEM professionals, often cite a STEM teacher they had as being the impetus for their career decision. More formal teacher pipeline programs for high school students , specific to STEM or more general like Educators Rising, are also interesting models. Knowing more about findings from the research question you pose would definitely be a useful part of the bigger picture on this issue from the recruitment side, though slowing the rate at which effective STEM teachers leave high-need school districts would decrease the amount of new STEM teachers needed each year.

  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    May 9, 2020 | 04:36 p.m.

    DeeDee and Jennifer, great topic for discussion. I am also taken aback when STEM teaching is (typically) not included in the list of STEM careers students are encouraged to pursue. We all need to continue our work to change that dialogue. Also agree current STEM teachers can play an important role in inspiring and retaining the next generation of STEM teachers! 

  • Icon for: Mark Bealo

    Mark Bealo

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2020 | 04:34 a.m.

    This one really hit home for me. I followed the link referenced in your video to one of the papers. I completely identify with the statement that "a growing number of recent studies have found teacher perceptions of their working conditions are strongly associated with teachers’ decisions to leave a school" as well as the finding that "'teachers who leave high-poverty schools are not fleeing their students, but rather the poor working conditions that make it difficult for them to teach and their students to learn.' Research on the relationship between teacher working conditions and teacher attrition or turnover suggests the working condition that has the strongest relationship with teacher intentions to remain at a school is leadership behaviors." I've been teaching at the same institution of higher education for over 20 years, and the past several years have me strongly considering applying for other professor positions to get out from under the current oppressive environment. I absolutely love our students and HAD been thrilled and blessed to be at the campus, but the endurance to stick it out is waning.

     
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    Ann Cavallo
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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 12, 2020 | 11:06 a.m.

    Mark, your point and Hollylynne's follow up is important; leadership programs at all levels and disciplines - and particularly for high-need schools and institutions of higher education - would do well to attend to attend to the research findings about why good employees leave by focusing on how to create a productive culture of continuous improvement in which employees can thrive and be appropriately supported and developed.

  • Icon for: Hollylynne Lee

    Hollylynne Lee

    Facilitator
    May 11, 2020 | 09:42 a.m.

    I think Mark's point that highlights the finding that STEM teachers are not leaving high poverty schools becasue of the stduents is a crucial one.  This is where the message needs to get to the leadership preparation programs (for principals and instructional coaches) to focus on what it takes to lead a high poverty school with appropriate focus and support in STEM!

  • Icon for: Faiza Peetz, MD

    Faiza Peetz, MD

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2020 | 09:56 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing. Your video was eye opening.

  • Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 12, 2020 | 11:07 a.m.

    Thanks for stopping by!

  • Icon for: Audrey Shor

    Audrey Shor

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2020 | 10:38 a.m.

    I really enjoyed your video Jennifer and am excited to hear that so much more attention is being put in this under-served area. My University has just been awarded our second NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship funding and we are currently recruiting students majoring in STEM disciplines, while also gaining experience and training in teaching. The combined support will shape more confident educators. Training confident, inspirational STEM educators is so important, in fact my fifth-grade science teacher helped put me on my own path to academia. Perhaps the next rendition of support for recruiting and retaining excellent educators in high-poverty schools would increase availability of mechanisms for funding mentoring programs within the schools/districts and funding continued professional development; thereby supporting the growth of a community to support sustained development and support. Teachers are spread so thin and so much is asked of them, with such little pay. Casting a wider net of financially supporting these efforts would provide an excellent return on investment. Thanks for support future STEM educators.

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    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 12, 2020 | 11:16 a.m.

    Congrats on your second Noyce grant! I am glad you enjoyed the video and definitely agree regarding further support of mentoring. I would advocate that these initiatives should be structured in a way that allows for systematic study of what models maximize return on investment, as our authors found few existing studies focusing on what induction interventions work best for STEM teachers in high-need schools, to better inform future investments.

  • Icon for: Audrey Shor

    Audrey Shor

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 12, 2020 | 11:31 a.m.

    Thank you Jennifer! I'm super proud of the faculty who earned the award(s). Exactly! There are such programs, it would be great to have a summary of best practices for helping to shape continued support and community building. 

  • Icon for: Rebecca Ellis

    Rebecca Ellis

    Researcher
    May 12, 2020 | 03:40 p.m.

    I am so glad I found your video. Suzanne Wilson was my favorite professor back when she was at Michigan State, and I love her writing. I have downloaded your resources and will add them to my library!

  • Icon for: Jennifer Carinci

    Jennifer Carinci

    Lead Presenter
    Program Director, STEM Education Research
    May 12, 2020 | 04:48 p.m.

    So cool. Thanks for sharing this connection, Rebecca! Kudos on the exciting and useful tool described in your video.

     
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    Rebecca Ellis
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