See Related: Research / Evaluation
  1. Jessica Gale
  2. https://www.ceismc.gatech.edu/about/staffdirectory/dr-jessica-gale
  3. Senior Research Scientist
  4. An Exploratory Study: The Role of Social Networks and Self-Efficacy in the Retention of Noyce Teachers
  5. https://www.ceismc.gatech.edu/noyce
  6. Georgia Institute of Technology
  1. Meltem Alemdar
  2. https://www.ceismc.gatech.edu/about/staffdirectory/meltem-alemdar
  3. Senior Research Scientist/PI
  4. An Exploratory Study: The Role of Social Networks and Self-Efficacy in the Retention of Noyce Teachers
  5. https://www.ceismc.gatech.edu/noyce
  6. Georgia Institute of Technology
  1. Christopher Cappelli
  2. https://www.ceismc.gatech.edu/about/staffdirectory/christopher-cappelli
  3. Senior Research Associate/Co-PI
  4. An Exploratory Study: The Role of Social Networks and Self-Efficacy in the Retention of Noyce Teachers
  5. https://www.ceismc.gatech.edu/noyce
  6. Georgia Institute of Technology
  1. Emily Frobos
  2. Research Project Coordinator II
  3. An Exploratory Study: The Role of Social Networks and Self-Efficacy in the Retention of Noyce Teachers
  4. https://www.ceismc.gatech.edu/noyce
  5. Georgia Institute of Technology
  1. Steven Taylor
  2. Communications Manager
  3. An Exploratory Study: The Role of Social Networks and Self-Efficacy in the Retention of Noyce Teachers
  4. https://www.ceismc.gatech.edu/noyce
  5. Georgia Institute of Technology
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Jessica Gale

    Jessica Gale

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 4, 2020 | 09:49 a.m.

    Welcome to our research project video showcase!

    Our study, supported by the National Science Foundations' Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program through Track 4 Noyce Research, draws on a sample of Noyce Teacher Fellows to explore the influence of teachers’ personal networks and self-efficacy on the retention of early career teachers in high-need schools. For this video, we focused on one area of our larger exploratory study - teachers’ self-efficacy and the sources of self-efficacy. We hope that the findings of the study will be of broad interest to programs working to prepare, support, and retain early career teachers and of particular interest to the more than three hundred Noyce projects funded through the NSF Noyce Program. We look forward to your input and comments about our study!

     
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    Kristin Flaming
  • May 5, 2020 | 02:32 p.m.

    I love the practicality of this video. Such a useful area to study. We are working to prepare future teachers, as well as in-service teachers, and the self-efficacy focus is timely. It's also helpful to know the holistic definition of self-efficacy and how important it is to include all components.

  • Icon for: Jessica Gale

    Jessica Gale

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 5, 2020 | 02:39 p.m.

    Hi Christine - Thank you for visiting our video. We certainly hope this work will be useful for those working with early career teachers. It's been interesting to learn about not only teachers' overall levels of self-efficacy but also the wide range of experiences and factors that have shaped their self-efficacy.  

  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 11:21 p.m.

    Why do you think the affective (how we feel) variable was more related to decreasing confidence (20%) and not increasing confidence? What was the range in years teaching of your sample (mentioned they were early career)? Did you survey some who were beyond say, 5 years in the profession? Wondering if there would be differences between new teachers and those who would be considered as being retained (e.g. 5+ years teaching). Might be beyond the scope of your study!

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Meltem Alemdar
  • Icon for: Jessica Gale

    Jessica Gale

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 6, 2020 | 10:14 a.m.

    Hi Ann - Thanks for your thoughtful questions. We don't have a definitive explanation for the difference in positive and negative affective/physiological states, but I think it may have to do with the salience of various states and how they relate with the other sources of self-efficacy. Teachers' descriptions of negative affective states often centered on recurrent episodes of stress, feeling burned out, feeling defeated, which may make these feelings were more salient to teachers and perhaps more directly related to self-efficacy than positive affective/physiological states. Additionally, teachers' descriptions of positive mastery experiences and social persuasions often also implied positive affective/physiological states, such as observing a "lightbulb moment" when a student understands a concept (mastery experience) or receiving positive feedback from a mentor (social persuasion). Since we were most interested in how teachers used information from the various sources to inform their appraisals of self-efficacy, we focused our coding on explicit rather than implicit evidence of the sources. Our main study focused on teachers in their first 5 years of teaching. Fortunately, we were also able to extend the sample to include a smaller group of experienced Noyce teachers with 5+ years of experience. We are in the process of analyzing that data, but social cognitive theory suggests that we should see some differences based on experience. For example, mastery experiences tend to be particularly influential sources of self-efficacy during the early stages of learning a difficult task, so we might expect to see fewer references to mastery experiences among teachers with 5+ years in the classroom.

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Isabel Huff
    Meltem Alemdar
  • Icon for: Ann Cavallo

    Ann Cavallo

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 12:14 a.m.

    Wonderful - I look forward to learning more about your findings as your work progresses. In my own work with Noyce Scholars, we looked at self-efficacy using the STEBI and MTEBI (you may be familiar?), so am interested in this instrument you used. We found overall self-efficacy toward teaching science and/or math to be (comparatively) low upon entering the teacher prep program, then it was significantly higher upon graduation and before teaching, and then it dropped after their first year of teaching, not quite to where it was at the start of the program, but still, they had lower self-efficacy toward teaching after classroom experience! Real-world experience took some of their confidence away maybe?

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
  • Icon for: Meltem Alemdar

    Meltem Alemdar

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 10:38 a.m.

    Thank you, Ann. Yes, we have seen similar results in other research projects regarding self-efficacy using the same instruments.The real-world experience definitely has an impact on their self-efficacy. In this study, the teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) was used (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001). It is also a validated instrument.

     
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    Ann Cavallo
    Mariana Enriquez
  • Icon for: Hollylynne Lee

    Hollylynne Lee

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 10:30 a.m.

    Jessica, I love the focus of this study on early career teachers' self-efficacy and its sources. I am wondering if there were any differences in SE or sources among teachers of different disciplines or grade levels. With your large sample you may have been able to disaggregate the data in this way to examine trends. 

     

     
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    Meltem Alemdar
  • Icon for: Jessica Gale

    Jessica Gale

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 6, 2020 | 11:09 a.m.

    Hi HollyLynne - Great questions. We didn't find significant differences in self-efficacy by level or discipline. We also haven't noticed any clear differences in the sources identified by grade level or discipline, but we are continuing to explore teachers' responses to the open-ended questions for any patterns. I should note that because the Noyce program focuses on recruiting and supporting STEM teachers, nearly all of the teachers in our sample are either high school or middle school math or science teachers, so we are somewhat limited in conclusions we can draw about variations in self-efficacy across levels and subjects. 

     
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    Gregory Lawson
    Mariana Enriquez
  • Icon for: Hollylynne Lee

    Hollylynne Lee

    Facilitator
    May 11, 2020 | 09:57 a.m.

    Thanks for the repy. I like that most of your sample is middle and high school teachers, as those teachers often have more focused mastery experiences in their content area (math or science).  Did any aspects of your survey ask about specific SE related to the content they teach?  I am sure the general teacher SE instrument was content-neutral. But wondering if you added any questions specific to SE in teahcing disciplinary content (or perhaps this could be a follow-up).  A few years ago, one of my graduate students and myself reported on preservice math teachers readiness to teach statistics in high school. We used a specific instrument about statistics teaching SE. See paper in JTE if interested. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022487117697918

    I agree with you that self-efficacy to teach is an important construct to examine in our research as well as to establish ways to support the development of positive SE in our work with STEM teachers. Thanks for your strong contribution to this area!

  • Icon for: Jessica Gale

    Jessica Gale

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 11, 2020 | 12:21 p.m.

    Hi Hollylynne - We didn't include content-specific self-efficacy items, mainly because the self-efficacy instrument was part of a much longer survey and we wanted to keep it manageable. Fortunately, the TSES has a short form that has also been validated, so we used that. I'll take a look at that JTE article - sounds interesting! 

  • May 6, 2020 | 12:36 p.m.

    Great to see such strong Noyce Track 4 representation in the showcase, with clear accessible explanations of complex research! My confidence is increasing vicariously seeing your success;) I will be very interested to see the results of your investigations regarding Noyce program characteristics and interconnections. Any early findings you can share?

  • Icon for: Meltem Alemdar

    Meltem Alemdar

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 02:44 p.m.

    Thank you, Jennifer. In terms of the connection between self-efficacy and Noyce program characteristics, we are still analyzing the data. We just completed some follow up interviews with Noyce teachers, and one of the focuses is exploring Noyce program influence on self-efficacy. The other part of the study is related to social network analysis. The results suggest there are moderate to large correlations between specific Noyce Program characteristics and network measures (teacher support network), suggesting that Noyce Programs that include these characteristics (mentoring, support for the professional conferences, student teaching experience in high-need) are more effective for building support networks for new teachers. We are also dicing the sample further to look at more subgroups such as novice teachers, science versus math teachers etc. Currently working on a few publications that we hope to get out by Fall.

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
  • Icon for: Beth Sappe

    Beth Sappe

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 02:00 p.m.

    Recruit, support, and retain teachers in high needs schools is so important so thank you for focusing on this important work.

    The data on teacher social persuasions and experiences that influence their confidence is interesting to me. Are there any patterns aligned to grade bands of teachers? What about the size of the department the teachers work in, we find that schools with larger number of teachers per content area tend to have better support systems, which I would think would give them confidence that is more positive.

  • Icon for: Jessica Gale

    Jessica Gale

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 7, 2020 | 03:39 p.m.

    Hi Beth - 

    Teachers in our study are primarily middle and high school teachers. We haven't found clear differences or patterns by grade level, but we are still exploring the data. Your note about department size is interesting. In open-ended responses, many teachers do discuss support (or lack thereof) as influencing their confidence. Our larger exploratory study is using social network analysis to look at relationships between teachers' personal networks, Noyce program characteristics, self-efficacy, and retention. We are in the process of analyzing this data, but we may have findings related to teachers' networks and support and their self-efficacy soon. 

  • Icon for: Beth Sappe

    Beth Sappe

    Facilitator
    May 8, 2020 | 11:45 a.m.

    Thanks for the response Jessica. There are so many ways to explore the data. One of the reasons this work is so exciting:) 

  • Icon for: Kristin Flaming

    Kristin Flaming

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 7, 2020 | 02:26 p.m.

    This is such a needed program for early career educators. What disciplines do the teachers in your program represent?

  • Icon for: Jessica Gale

    Jessica Gale

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 7, 2020 | 03:45 p.m.

    Our study actually includes teachers from 60 NSF Noyce programs across the country. As the Noyce program focuses on recruiting and supporting STEM teachers, about 90% of the teachers in our study are either math or science teachers. You can learn more about the NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program at https://www.nsfnoyce.org/ . 

  • Icon for: Mariana Enriquez

    Mariana Enriquez

    Researcher
    May 7, 2020 | 06:47 p.m.

    Hello there!

    This is such an interesting study! I was wondering if your data analyses include looking at differences by teachers' race/ethnicity, and how these impact their sources of self-efficacy, especially their vicarious experiences, and their retention after 5 years. Another variable of interest is whether they are first generation college students.

    Have you already published any of your findings where I could look more closely to some of your findings?

    Thank you!

  • Icon for: Meltem Alemdar

    Meltem Alemdar

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 03:28 p.m.

    Thank you, Mariana. The study also has social network analysis part too, we are currently finishing up the analysis. We are still working through the data, including looking at subgroups, but for the quantitative analysis the subgroups are very small, we might able to look at the group differences in our qual. data. We are also in the process of publishing.

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
  • Icon for: Mariana Enriquez

    Mariana Enriquez

    Researcher
    May 8, 2020 | 08:14 p.m.

    Thank you! I'd love to read your reports and/or publications.

  • Icon for: Lisa Flores

    Lisa Flores

    Researcher
    May 11, 2020 | 12:41 p.m.

    This is a very important study. I'm wondering if you have examined differences between Noyce scholarship participants and non-scholarship participants. Also, do you have a sense of whether teacher self-efficacy scores are linked to student outcomes or other evidence of teaching effectiveness?  I look forward to seeing these findings when they are published.

  • Icon for: Jessica Gale

    Jessica Gale

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Research Scientist
    May 11, 2020 | 02:19 p.m.

    Hi Lisa - Thank you for your kind words. As a Noyce Track 4 Research project, our study focused on Noyce scholars. We didn't collect data on student outcomes or direct measures of teaching effectiveness in this particular exploratory study, but there interesting research documenting relationships between self-efficacy and student outcomes and effectiveness. For those interested in these links, I suggest Klassen and Tze's meta-analysis:

    Klassen, R. M., & Tze, V. M. (2014). Teachers’ self-efficacy, personality, and teaching effectiveness: A meta-analysis. Educational Research Review12, 59-76.

     

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