1. Rebecca Atadero
  2. Associate Professor
  3. Collaborative Research: IUSE-EHR: Cultivating Inclusive Identities of Engineers and Computer Scientists: Expanding Efforts to Infuse Inclusive Excellence in Undergraduate Curricula
  4. http://partnership4equity.org/
  5. Colorado State University
  1. Aramati Casper
  2. Research Associate
  3. Collaborative Research: IUSE-EHR: Cultivating Inclusive Identities of Engineers and Computer Scientists: Expanding Efforts to Infuse Inclusive Excellence in Undergraduate Curricula
  4. http://partnership4equity.org/
  5. Colorado State University
  1. Christopher Griffin
  2. https://cdgriffin.me
  3. Teaching Assistant Professor
  4. Collaborative Research: IUSE-EHR: Cultivating Inclusive Identities of Engineers and Computer Scientists: Expanding Efforts to Infuse Inclusive Excellence in Undergraduate Curricula
  5. http://partnership4equity.org/
  6. West Virginia University
  1. Scott Leutenegger
  2. http://www.cs.du.edu/~leut
  3. Professor
  4. Collaborative Research: IUSE-EHR: Cultivating Inclusive Identities of Engineers and Computer Scientists: Expanding Efforts to Infuse Inclusive Excellence in Undergraduate Curricula
  5. http://partnership4equity.org/
  6. University of Denver
  1. Christina Paguyo
  2. Director of Academic Assessment
  3. Collaborative Research: IUSE-EHR: Cultivating Inclusive Identities of Engineers and Computer Scientists: Expanding Efforts to Infuse Inclusive Excellence in Undergraduate Curricula
  4. http://partnership4equity.org/
  5. University of Denver
  1. Jody Paul
  2. https://jodypaul.com
  3. Professor
  4. Collaborative Research: IUSE-EHR: Cultivating Inclusive Identities of Engineers and Computer Scientists: Expanding Efforts to Infuse Inclusive Excellence in Undergraduate Curricula
  5. http://partnership4equity.org/
  6. Metropolitan State University of Denver
  1. Karen Rambo-Hernandez
  2. Associate Professor
  3. Collaborative Research: IUSE-EHR: Cultivating Inclusive Identities of Engineers and Computer Scientists: Expanding Efforts to Infuse Inclusive Excellence in Undergraduate Curricula
  4. http://partnership4equity.org/
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Rebecca Atadero

    Rebecca Atadero

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 4, 2020 | 04:45 p.m.

    Welcome!

    Our project is called Partnership for Equity or P4E:STEM.  We are a collaborative team working to develop, implement and assess new curriculum related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in undergraduate engineering and computer science courses at four partner campuses.  My co-presenters and I are excited to engage with you this week.

    Our philosophy is that ALL students in engineering and computer science benefit when they are prepared to 1) recognize the value diversity brings to professional activities, 2) work inclusively on teams, and 3) consider the impact of their professional work on a diverse population. When these three factors are combined with the technical skills and knowledge of a student's chosen discipline, we call this an inclusive professional identity.

    Please let us know what questions you have or if you have any suggestions for our project.

     

     
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    Megan McKinley-Hicks
    Christina Paguyo
    Karen Rambo-Hernandez
  • Icon for: Christopher Jett

    Christopher Jett

    May 5, 2020 | 10:45 a.m.

    Hello Rebecca,

    As you know, I am already familiar with this important project. I look forward to following it. Keep up the exceptional work!!!   

    Chris

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Karen Rambo-Hernandez

    Karen Rambo-Hernandez

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 11:51 a.m.

    Hi Chris! 

    This is Karen- I'm also involved on the project. I just stopped by to check on our video comments and saw yours! Thanks for stopping by and for the kudos! 

    Karen Rambo-Hernandez 

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Ann Gates

    Ann Gates

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 5, 2020 | 12:46 p.m.

    Great job on your video!  The messaging is one of the best that I've seen.  The Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions has defined strategic actions on identity and belonging and emphasizes the importance of culturally relevant pedagogy.  I hope that we can find time to connect and learn from your project.

     
    2
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    Christina Paguyo
    Karen Rambo-Hernandez
  • Icon for: Jody Paul

    Jody Paul

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 01:02 p.m.


    Hi Ann,


    Thank you for the kind comments.


    Very much looking forward to connecting with you and the Computing Alliance of HSIs!
    (MSU Denver earned HSI status at the beginning of 2019.)


    --Jody Paul



     

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Ximena Dominguez

    Ximena Dominguez

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 01:41 p.m.

    Hi, Rebecca. What a great video. I really enjoyed how you articulated the importance and need for it, and learning about your work and your approach to equity. Our team is investigating how CT can be promoted in ways that integrate math/science and link and home learning. Our effort involves bringing families, educators, researchers and developers together to co-design activities and resources that are equitable and address the strengths and needs of the communities served in public preschool programs. It would be great to connect and learn more about strategies and lessons learned from your work. 

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Rebecca Atadero

    Rebecca Atadero

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 04:56 p.m.

    Hi Ximena,

    The credit for the video goes to the media team at the University of Denver.

    I enjoyed your video and loved the goals of your project.  I don't know much about early education, but I do wonder if there are lessons that go along with CT about how different people might think about problems in different ways and that different approaches are useful.  I know that young children are picking up messages about who is good at math and science early in their lives.

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Sara Yeo

    Sara Yeo

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 04:12 p.m.

    I enjoyed the video and had a couple of questions:

    1. Are there any anecdotes that you could share related to how your team came up with this idea?
    2. What are some ways in which you might be able to measure success of P4E:STEM?

    Looking forward to the discussion, thanks!

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Rebecca Atadero

    Rebecca Atadero

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 05:08 p.m.

    Hi Sara,

    1. The idea for this project originated with a prior study where we were testing new group activities in a sophomore level undergraduate engineering course.  We recorded students working in teams with the intent of evaluating the assignment prompt.  When the videos were analyzed there were some cases where women students were marginalized in their teams. This was when I realized that no matter what kinds of resources we provide to students who are underrepresented in engineering they are still going to be working in classrooms with majority peers who may or may not recognize the impact of their words and actions. We need to engage with as many students as possible to change the climate in engineering.

    2. Great question. We are collecting a variety of data to measure the impact of our activities including surveys in courses (before and after new activities are implemented), assessments of individual assignments, longitudinal surveys, and interviews with students.  Measuring changes of this nature is challenging, and as our campuses adopt new diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives it is hard to say which changes in student attitudes are directly related to our project.

     
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    Michael I. Swart
    Mariana Enriquez
    Sara Yeo
    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Sara Yeo

    Sara Yeo

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 02:17 p.m.

    That's great, Rebecca. Thank you for your responses!

  • May 12, 2020 | 05:10 p.m.

    Good to see such a varied range of metrics and data collection.  Since many of the skillsets associated with stem pursuits are useful across disciplines, is there a larger evaluative component for skills like computational thinking, scientific reasoning, spatial thinking, metacognitive evaluation, etc.?  that might enable your program to also demonstrate cross-disciplinary learning?  Thanks for sharing.

  • Icon for: Travis York

    Travis York

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 5, 2020 | 04:28 p.m.

    I really appreciate that your video emphasizes that having diverse STEM researchers and teams can actually do better science and solve our world's problems!  This is a great connection to the work of our Aspire Alliance where we work with institutions to help cultivate organizations that can recruit, hire, and retain inclusive and diverse STEM Faculty.  We are constantly trying to balance our messaging to include the benefits these faculty will have on increasing URG student success AND the benefit and contributions that a more diverse faculty can have in their scientific fields and communities.  

    I wonder how this project might not only encourage an inclusive STEM identity but also encourage URG STEM students to consider and pursue academic careers?  This may be a great space for our projects to collaborate and support one another!  Feel free to check out our video here: https://stemforall2020.videohall.com/presentations/1897 

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Christopher Griffin

    Christopher Griffin

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 04:35 p.m.

    Travis,

    Thanks for your comment! I certainly think seeing other URG represented in academia would encourage such students to at least consider academic careers. I also think just seeing faculty and other peers that see the value in diversity and encourage it in their instruction has a positive effect. I look forward to viewing your video!

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • May 7, 2020 | 10:10 p.m.

    Excellent messaging and partnership! Along these lines I might suggest checking out the following AAAS work: Sea Change (around sustainable change with regard to diversity, equity, and inclusion in STEMM at U.S. institutions of higher education), ERN Conference video in showcase (provides underrepresented undergraduate and graduate student STEM researchers a chance to present their research and find community), and AAAS IF/THEN Ambassadors (showing girls if you see it, you can be it).

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Christina Paguyo

    Christina Paguyo

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 10:40 p.m.

    Hi, Jennifer - Thanks for your kind words! We appreciate the resources you shared, particularly surrounding cultural transformations regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in higher education. An ongoing challenge is igniting and sustaining organizational change––independent of the specific individuals/roles who are championing DEI efforts––so that DEI efforts are animated at the departmental, collegiate, and institutional levels through a spectrum of mechanisms. At some of our institutions, for example, we are exploring how inclusive teaching practices and conducting research about scholarship of teaching and learning can count toward tenure and promotion. 

  • Icon for: Nancy Shapiro

    Nancy Shapiro

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 04:29 p.m.

    What an engaging video!  You set up the problem in a way that draws in the viewer immediately.  The pace of the presentation was spot on, also.  What I'm missing is a better understanding of the actual work you are doing--I understand it is curricular (rather than recruitment/retention) but are you engaging other disciplines to create relevant collaborative problems to solve in engineering and CS?  I'm curious how you are approaching curricular redesign from the perspective of "inclusiveness."

     
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    Christina Paguyo
    Becky Mazur
  • Icon for: Rebecca Atadero

    Rebecca Atadero

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 05:24 p.m.

    Hi Nancy,

    Currently we are working mostly within individual disciplines.  The new curriculum activities we have been developing generally fall into one of three different categories:

    1. Basic skills related to diversity and inclusion (for example, lessons about implicit bias)

    2. Skills related to inclusive teamwork (e.g. having students reflect about their work in teams, learning about concepts such as psychological safety, appreciating different perspectives in problem solving)

    3. Case studies about the impact of products or designs on different types of users (e.g. looking at seat-belts in dynamics, or social justice/environmental justice case studies)

     
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    Christina Paguyo
    Becky Mazur
  • May 12, 2020 | 04:42 p.m.

    No hay duda al respecto: tener un grupo de investigación diverso enriquece la experiencia de todos en mi laboratorio. A veces hemos contado cinco religiones, 4 lenguas maternas, múltiples tonos de piel, razas y géneros. No puedo decir que la ciencia que hacemos cambia debido a eso (a diferencia de los cinturones de seguridad en sus videos), pero ciertamente impacta nuestros proyectos de divulgación educativa y crea oportunidades para todos.

  • Icon for: Joe Heimlich

    Joe Heimlich

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 05:05 p.m.

    Thanks for this video, but especially for the project. Great premise for the work, wonderful justification, and I hope the project leads to some amazing outcomes for the students and institutions involved and ultimately benefit all of us! Nice project (and great video)

     
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    Christina Paguyo
    Becky Mazur
  • Icon for: Rebecca Atadero

    Rebecca Atadero

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 05:17 p.m.

    Thanks for the encouragement Joe!

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Nancy Shapiro

    Nancy Shapiro

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 06:47 p.m.

    Thanks for the detail about the curriculum components.

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Ivory Toldson

    Ivory Toldson

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 08:47 p.m.

    Very well done. The issue that you are trying to address is highly relevant and will impact meaningful change in the field. I particularly appreciated your commentary on the need for diverse perspectives to be embraced. I think the outcome which you are seeking for young people being inclusive professional identities will further propel the field. Again, very nicely done, I enjoyed learning about this meaningful project. 

    What challenges have you faced thus far and how have you addressed them?

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Christopher Griffin

    Christopher Griffin

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 11:53 a.m.

    To add to Karen's comment, I would say a challenge is to make the activities appropriate for the specific course and not make it obvious it is a "diversity" type exercise. I think it is more beneficial to the students when a consequence of the particular exercise is the realization that different points of view helped make a better solution.

     
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    Christina Paguyo
    Karen Rambo-Hernandez
  • Icon for: Karen Rambo-Hernandez

    Karen Rambo-Hernandez

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 10:56 a.m.

    Hi Ivory, 

    I think my most difficult piece has been in recruiting facutly to participate- generally they all see the problems, but don't see how they can (or should) address the issues in technical classes. And faculty have a pretty wide range of comfort in addressing issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. We've done some co-teaching with the faculty to help them get more comfortable leading discussions so they can eventually incorporate the activities without us. For the faculty who are creating activities for their courses with us, we also have a stipend (which helps), but more sustainable and meaningful approach has been when the faculty see the problems and want to work with us to develop activities to address those problems. 

    In other cases, the activities are part of the curriculum- so if you teach class X, you do activities A, B, C, and D. The easier we made the activities to do (online modules, out of class experiences) the better... for these activities that are now part of the coursework, we've also tried to be very responsive when faculty make suggestions about how to improve the activities.  

    Also, the individual recruitment is time intensive and slow. The universities that have made diversity efforts a large priority also seem to have better faculty support. 

     
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    Ivory Toldson
    Christina Paguyo
  • May 12, 2020 | 04:45 p.m.

    Lessons in biology? ecology?

  • May 6, 2020 | 04:26 p.m.

    What a great project! Do you have a repository of examples from different courses that we could look at? I have been thinking about how to incorporate diversity and inclusion topics in my classes but I have not been able to come up with one yet. I teach courses such as: fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics. Thanks.

     
    1
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Karen Rambo-Hernandez

    Karen Rambo-Hernandez

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 04:31 p.m.

    Certainly, Orlando! We have some available here: http://partnership4equity.org/ in the resources tab. This will give you an idea of what we are doing. We have about 30 created, but we haven't formatted them all for posting on the website yet. I will check with the rest of the team to see which activities might be relevant for you and will attach them here. 

    In general, we have categorized our activities into those that are course specific and those that could be dropped into any course. 

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • May 6, 2020 | 04:35 p.m.

    Thanks

     
    1
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Christine Sachs

    Christine Sachs

    K-12 Teacher
    May 8, 2020 | 08:40 a.m.

     Excellent project and accompanying video! Thank you for sharing the P4E:STEM resources.

     
    1
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: James Veseskis

    James Veseskis

    K-12 Teacher
    May 8, 2020 | 08:51 a.m.

    Great Project! I would love to share equity lessons, tips, and just have a general conversation about equity in CS classroom if possible?

     
    1
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Christina Paguyo

    Christina Paguyo

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2020 | 09:14 a.m.

    Hi, James! We would welcome the opportunity to chat. Would you like to email us to schedule a mutually open date/time? Thanks so much! 

  • Icon for: Kenne Dibner

    Kenne Dibner

    Researcher
    May 8, 2020 | 09:28 a.m.

    I love this video - it does a great job explaining the problem you're trying to solve. One thing I wondered is about how you engage partners in this work - do you run up against resistance to course redesign, or are folks generally really open? Thanks so much for sharing!

     
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    Christina Paguyo
    Jody Paul
  • Icon for: Christopher Griffin

    Christopher Griffin

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 10:35 a.m.

    I'll allow my colleagues to add, but in my experience faculty are open to introducing exercises into their courses that incorporate diversity and inclusivity. Our approach is to engage with the faculty face to face as much as possible to discuss what our project is about and how it relates to their course. In many of the activities, we have one of our team help lead it during class. We want to limit any perceived burden as much as possible. In fact, once talking with faculty they often are excited about introducing these concepts in their class and seeing their students actively working together.

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Rebecca Atadero

    Rebecca Atadero

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 8, 2020 | 12:49 p.m.

    HI Keene,

    I agree with Chris, many faculty are open to trying something and once they do one activity many faculty have been willing to try other things.  I think the biggest source of resistance is how busy faculty are.  Sometimes we have faculty agree to try something,but then it is a struggle to develop things in time.  One thing that has worked at CSU was to hire an undergrad research assistant to help a professor develop activities.  Having the undergrad not only helped with faculty time, but also helped us make sure the activity was right for the target audience.

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Jody Paul

    Jody Paul

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 02:42 p.m.

    Faculty in CS at MSU Denver have expressed universal support for the intent.  A concern is with the institutional environment in which onerous faculty workloads already interfere with basic review and updating of curriculum (outcomes, content, and delivery).  The challenge is finding a way of offering curricular change that lessens the already heavy burden on faculty in these kinds of environments.  Such changes, I believe, are very likely to be adopted posthaste.

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Bryce Hughes

    Bryce Hughes

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 8, 2020 | 12:22 p.m.

    Thanks for a great video on an important project! I've been involved in quite a bit of work addressing broadening participation in STEM, and so it's nice to see this message reinforced and amplified to build and sustain commitments to this work. One project I'm involved with examines leadership development in engineering (not featured in this showcase), and we were encouraged to see that (broadly speaking) experiences where students can interact across difference supports their leadership development. We not only know that learning in a diverse environment improves educational outcomes, but it improves other outcomes as well.

    I saw in an earlier comment that you are gathering some data to evaluate the effectiveness of the program; are there any specific outcomes or benefits you hope to observe?

    Again, thanks!

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Karen Rambo-Hernandez

    Karen Rambo-Hernandez

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 01:38 p.m.

    Hi Bryce! 

    We are looking at lots of different data sources- we are measuring student value of diversity in engineering/CS and their likelihood to enact inclusive behaviors (looking for increases in both relative to students who did not participate and comparing different groups of students), we are qualitatively analyzing their responses to the activties, and we are also using Social Cognitive Career Theory to assess their development into engineers or computer scientists- and looking to see if groups who had the interventions and those from diverse backgrounds develop in the same way (or are certain portions more salient in their development). 

    Some of our indication of successes also looks at adoption and participation by faculty... our end goal for the activities is they just become part of the standard curriculum and not necessarily tied to the grant.  

    I'd love to hear what types of outcomes you're using! We are always looking for different ways to capture the impact of the project! 

     

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • Icon for: Bryce Hughes

    Bryce Hughes

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 8, 2020 | 02:12 p.m.

    That does sound exciting. We've observed that finding ways to infuse leadership into the curriculum can be most effective, similar to what you are describing.

    The outcome we're most focused on is a construct we proposed called engineering leadership identity, integrated from what we know about engineering identity and leadership identity. The project is a pure research project in that we engaged in a mixed methods study across existing datasets of college students and our own qualitative data collection following a grounded theory approach, but our next phase is working on programmatic/curricular interventions that would foster engineering leadership identity. The outcome I was referring to is a construct measured by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute that measures leadership self-efficacy which was built into the survey dataset we analyzed. But since we expect leadership self-efficacy may be an indicator or outcome of leadership identity, we assume interactions across difference help boost this particular aspect of identity as well.

    I'll be interested to learn more about your development of inclusive engineering identity because it aligns well with the work I'm familiar with, and the bit I've been involved with, on engineering identity. The more ways we can show students how they can become engineers, the more broadly attractive the field will be in the service of broadening participation!

     
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    Christina Paguyo
  • May 11, 2020 | 03:59 p.m.

    Such an futuristic project. It is great to account for equity especially when the world is changing so rapidly with new technologies. At the University of Arizona, we have a program called indige-FEWSS in which we try to address food, water and energy hardships in Navajo Nation. Please check out our video.

  • Icon for: Aramati Casper

    Aramati Casper

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2020 | 04:02 p.m.

    Thank you for your interest and comment about the importance of equity. I appreciate you sharing your video, your project sounds excellent as well!

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.