1. Rebecca Roberts
  2. https://www.ursinus.edu/live/profiles/49-rebecca-roberts
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Collaborative Research: Using protein function prediction to promote hypothesis-driven thinking in undergraduate biochemistry education
  5. https://basilbiochem.github.io/basil/
  6. Ursinus College
  1. Paul Craig
  2. https://www.rit.edu/directory/pac8612-paul-craig
  3. Professor
  4. Collaborative Research: Using protein function prediction to promote hypothesis-driven thinking in undergraduate biochemistry education
  5. https://basilbiochem.github.io/basil/
  6. Rochester Institute of Technology
  1. Bonnie Hall
  2. Associate Professor
  3. Collaborative Research: Using protein function prediction to promote hypothesis-driven thinking in undergraduate biochemistry education
  4. https://basilbiochem.github.io/basil/
  5. Grand View University
  1. Stefan Irby
  2. https://stefanirby.com
  3. Postdoctoral Scholar
  4. Collaborative Research: Using protein function prediction to promote hypothesis-driven thinking in undergraduate biochemistry education
  5. https://basilbiochem.github.io/basil/
  6. University of Central Florida, Purdue University
  1. Ashley Ringer McDonald
  2. Associate Professor
  3. Collaborative Research: Using protein function prediction to promote hypothesis-driven thinking in undergraduate biochemistry education
  4. https://basilbiochem.github.io/basil/
  5. Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
  1. Arthur Sikora
  2. Assistant Professor
  3. Collaborative Research: Using protein function prediction to promote hypothesis-driven thinking in undergraduate biochemistry education
  4. https://basilbiochem.github.io/basil/
  5. Nova Southeastern University
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Rebecca Roberts

    Rebecca Roberts

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 4, 2020 | 09:52 a.m.

    Thankyou for watching our video. The members of the BASIL (Biochemistry Authentic Scientific Inquiry Lab) have enjoyed a multi-year, nation-wide collaboration as we built and assessed this curriculum. Most of our work has been accomplished virtually, so we didn't feel many bumps as the whole world moved to distance work. We would love to hear about your collaborations (successful or not-so-much) and how the pandemic has impacted your work together.

  • Icon for: Paul Craig

    Paul Craig

    Co-Presenter
    May 4, 2020 | 09:21 p.m.

    What a wonderful job producing the video, Rebecca. In just 3 minutes, you told a story about collaboration and impact. Great job!

  • Icon for: Bonnie Hall

    Bonnie Hall

    Co-Presenter
    May 4, 2020 | 11:26 p.m.

    Even while we prepared this presentation, I learned more about effective collaboration and good mentoring.  Let us know how your team collaborates at distance, especially with the abrupt switch to all collaborations being at distance.

  • Icon for: Leslie Koren

    Leslie Koren

    Assistant Professor of Media Arts
    May 5, 2020 | 10:40 a.m.

    Thanks for sharing this video on this topic! I can see how this would promote interdisciplinary thinking as well, beyond the students' time in BASIL. Have you seen that? Feel free to check out our video as well! 

  • Icon for: Rebecca Roberts

    Rebecca Roberts

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 5, 2020 | 12:18 p.m.

    Thanks Leslie. Yes, the collaboration has definitely promoted interdisciplinary thinking. Even more than that, it's allowed for faculty development in many different areas. For example, I came in as a protein biochemist and became interested in the discipline-based pedagogy part of the project. I was able to carry out a sabbatical at Purdue with Trevor Anderson on this topic.

  • Icon for: Monica VanDieren

    Monica VanDieren

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 5, 2020 | 12:06 p.m.

    What a great project!  I'm wondering about some of the details of evaluating student outcomes.  Which outcomes have you decided to focus on and why?  thanks.

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Paul Seeburger
  • Icon for: Stefan Irby

    Stefan Irby

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 01:25 p.m.

    Hi Monica!

    It looks like Arthur touched on this a bit in his comment below, but I just wanted to add some additional insight. I spent a significant amount of time thinking about what should be assessed. Many CURE curriculums, and lab curriculums, in general, tend to focus on either goals that are too broad to assess effectively or on procedural skills. Both are important, but we wanted to devise a way to identify Course-based Undergraduate Research Abilities (CURAs) that would be unique to the BASIL curriculum, in that they were vital abilities for this field of research and they were abilities that students would not encounter in other courses or experiences. 

     

    I have published a series of papers on: (1) how to identify these abilities for a course, (2) how CURAs can be used as Anticipated Learning Outcomes (ALOs) for designing student assessments, and (3) students' perceptions of their knowledge, experience, and confidence for the identified ALOs (CURAs).

     

    Links to the papers:

    (1) How to Identify the Research Abilities That Instructors Anticipate Students Will Develop in a Biochemistry Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE). https://www.lifescied.org/doi/10.1187/cbe.17-12...

    (2) Anticipated Learning Outcomes for a Biochemistry Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience Aimed at Predicting Protein Function from Structure: Implications for Assessment Design. https://iubmb.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.10...

    (3) Student Perceptions of Their Gains in Course-Based Undergraduate Research Abilities Identified as the Anticipated Learning Outcomes for a Biochemistry CURE. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jchemed.9b...

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Stephen Alkins
    Paul Seeburger
  • Icon for: Arthur Sikora

    Arthur Sikora

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 01:06 p.m.

    Thanks for watching!

    We have been fortunate to have robust anticipated learning outcomes that were developed by our collaborators at Purdue. The full set of is published in "Anticipated Learning Outcomes for a Biochemistry Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience Aimed at Predicting Protein Function from Structure: Implications for Assessment Design" Irby et al BAMBED 2018. Several members of the group have started working with these ALOs to design targeted assessments. 

    Personally, I started with the highest rated 10 statements, based on BASIL faculty feedback. It has been really interesting to see how some learning outcomes like "Identify an enzyme active site using appropriate computational programs" encompass several lab experiments while enzyme kinetics lab has several devoted to it but really depend on previous experiments.

  • May 5, 2020 | 03:29 p.m.

    Great video! I'd love to hear more about how your amazing CURE was replicated at multiple institutes. What were some of your first steps to build the collaborations?

     

  • Icon for: Bonnie Hall

    Bonnie Hall

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 03:33 p.m.

    I got connected to the BASIL project because of a presentation at a conference (two conferences, actually--one got me interested, the second got me involved).  For me the conferences were especially effective because I was out of my normal "busy" environment, and so had some bandwidth to consider a new project.  It also helped to meet some of the team, as it helped me know it was a good fit.  We also have weekly virtual meetings, and those were a great way to get started slowly--I could see what others were doing, and how it could fit with my students, courses, resources and workflows.  It's been an amazing journey with this group so far, and I'm excited to see how much farther we can go!

     
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    Gwendolyn Stovall
  • Icon for: Stephen Alkins

    Stephen Alkins

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 10:09 p.m.

     Thank you very much for your presentation

    My primary question lies along employing a student-centered approach in the design of the course.  Has there been any incorporation of student perspective into the design or how lessons are presented.  This may have been etched out in the third paper that Stefan Irby posted, but if you could provide some more clarification, that would be much appreciated.

    Great job on creating this collaborative network.  It seems like you can certainly expand all of the Biochemistry material you can fit into a semester and hit on some advanced topics.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Paul Craig
  • Icon for: Rebecca Roberts

    Rebecca Roberts

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 6, 2020 | 08:20 a.m.

    Hi Stephen - thanks for watching our presentation. We incorporated student perspective and feedback informally when we were starting the process. We all taught the course for one or two iterations to see what worked best, talked with the students in our respective courses, and came back together to readjust. Stefan Irby's work did poll students directly and we are now at the point of assessing the Anticipated Learning Outcomes (ALOs) that Stefan codified with directed assessments. In this way we'll be able to know if the students are actually achieving those objectives and then we can adjust the curriculum accordingly.

    In addition, we were passionate about empowering adopting instructors so that they could modify the curriculum to best suit their own goals and student populations. This is why it's in Word doc form so that instructors can freely alter or copy/paste. Indeed, even the core BASIL instructors each teach it a tad differenty (see our paper that describes this flexible implementation: https://iubmb.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/1...).

     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Stephen Alkins
  • Icon for: Wendy Smith

    Wendy Smith

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 08:01 p.m.

    Thanks for your video about BASIL. Where do you see your work with BASIL going in the future? Expand to more institutions, including community colleges? Develop aspects that can work for online courses?

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Michael I. Swart
    Paul Craig
  • Icon for: Rebecca Roberts

    Rebecca Roberts

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 7, 2020 | 09:15 a.m.

    Hi Wendy, thanks for your comments. You are reading our minds with your questions. Yes, our next phase is to expand to more institutions, to provide trainings (in person and online) to new adopters, as well as to expand the curriculum with more modules. We are also working this summer (hopefully with an NSF supplement) to move all of the wet lab modules to an online format, complete with simulations and data analysis. The computational modules are easily moved online already, so our hope is that by the start of the fall BASIL will also exist in a completely virtual environment.

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Michael I. Swart
    Stephen Alkins
  • Icon for: Feng Liu

    Feng Liu

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 02:31 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this video and project! It seems BASIL is another good example of community of practice (CoP) where members collaboratively build curriculums and share resources to develop students research experience. I would like to know more about the type of learning strategies integrated into BASIL and the ability of expanding it to other subject areas.

  • May 7, 2020 | 07:30 p.m.

    Thank you for the video, and great job. What types of challenges did you face in bringing together a diverse set of faculty from various institutions?

  • Icon for: Rebecca Roberts

    Rebecca Roberts

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Professor
    May 8, 2020 | 10:37 a.m.

    Hi Chris - thanks for watching our video. I think that we had two big challenges. The first was logistics. The team members represented four time zones and finding a time in our busy teaching days to get together virtually was challenging. Some semesters we couldn't manage it and would hold two meetings/week and record them for the others to watch. The second was the barriers of a common language. As a team composed of computer scientists, biochemists, computational chemists, and educational researchers we all had to learn the language of each field - at least to the extent that we could understand viewpoints, barriers, etc.

  • Icon for: Josh Beckham

    Josh Beckham

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 10, 2020 | 09:40 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing your work on the BASIL project. I have been interested in the protocols and approaches that you have taken - as I run a somewhat similar concept with my undergraduate students in the Freshman Research Initiative except they are all combined in one course credit as opposed to two separate classes. We are also starting to look at your PyRx protocols for the possibility of using them next year in a high school collaboration called the High School Research Initiative (Dr. Gwendolyn Stovall's Stem for All video).  Thank you for sharing your protocols and making them accessible for others!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Stefan Irby
  • Icon for: Paul Craig

    Paul Craig

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2020 | 04:59 p.m.

    Hi Josh, I believe we spoke several years ago about your Freshman Research Initiative. We are very interested in connecting with high schools. I will watch Dr. Stovall's video.

  • May 11, 2020 | 07:03 p.m.

    Hello Basil Team.  This is great work.  Just resounding some points earlier in the thread.  This is a practical framework for team building across specialties that has promise for great productivity; hoping it's being developed into a type of PD that can be shared.  Thanks. 

  • Icon for: Paul Craig

    Paul Craig

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2020 | 09:09 p.m.

    Hi Michael, thanks for visiting and for your comments. I will confess my ignorance - what is PD? We are learning to share this with other biochemistry educators and are talking about extending into closely related disciplines like cell biology. At the same time, we are thinking about the approach we are using and wondering how to go beyond our narrow focus on life sciences. What are your suggestions?

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.