1. Heather Griller Clark
  2. Principle Research Specialist
  3. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  4. Arizona State University ASU
  1. Jaime Cornejo
  2. Videographer
  3. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  4. University of Massachusetts Amherst
  1. Oressa Gray-Mullin
  2. Videographer
  3. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  4. Center for Youth Engagement, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  1. Annee Grayson
  2. Research Analyst Assistant
  3. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  4. Arizona State University ASU
  1. Ally Hunter
  2. post-doctoral research fellow
  3. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  4. University of Massachusetts Amherst
  1. Jeremy Kelleher
  2. Lead Software Engineer
  3. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  4. Center for Youth Engagement, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  1. Michael Krezmien
  2. Professor
  3. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  4. Center for Youth Engagement, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  1. Sarup Mathur
  2. https://education.asu.edu/sarup-mathur-0
  3. Professor
  4. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  5. Arizona State University ASU
  1. James Short
  2. Project Manager
  3. INSITE: INtegrating STEM Into Transition Education for Incarcerated Learners
  4. Arizona State University ASU
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Heather Griller Clark

    Heather Griller Clark

    Lead Presenter
    Principle Research Specialist
    May 4, 2020 | 07:35 p.m.

    Welcome to our INSITE video page. We are currently in Phase I of our project in which we are co-designing a STEM transition curriculum with teachers and youth from the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections. We are also addressing barriers to successful STEM employment for incarcerated youth by engaging local employers in identifying potential knowledge or skill gaps in the curriculum.

    We plan to analyze the impact of the curriculum on STEM career knowledge, interest, competencies, readiness, and employment. We also plan to explore Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) as it relates to incarcerated learners. 

    What are your thoughts? What gaps do you see in STEM career preparation for youth? How do you think the context of juvenile justice impacts STEM career development? 

    Please comment or ask questions.  Thank you for viewing.

     
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    Janelle Johnson
  • Icon for: Janelle Johnson

    Janelle Johnson

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 5, 2020 | 11:25 a.m.

    I'm not sure if you all are working on this, but share the outcomes of this project with policy makers. The youth can share their own stories and the impact of this work. It's important that the social justice focus shapes not only the individuals, but the larger systems as well. 

     
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    Heather Griller Clark
  • Icon for: Heather Griller Clark

    Heather Griller Clark

    Lead Presenter
    Principle Research Specialist
    May 5, 2020 | 11:55 a.m.

    Thank you for your comment Janelle, we agree.  We have extensive dissemination plans, including a wide variety of policy makers.

  • Icon for: Patti Curtis

    Patti Curtis

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 01:12 p.m.

    Thanks for your work in this area. I  like the career exploration app allowing youth to identify and align their values (and skills?) to possible STEM careers.   Can you tell us more about the steps being developed or offered to transitioning youth? Will you offer job fairs?  Are they able to earn credits or badges while incarcerated?  Is there assistance in community college or technical school applications? Resume writing, interview skills, etc?

     

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Heather Griller Clark
  • Icon for: Heather Griller Clark

    Heather Griller Clark

    Lead Presenter
    Principle Research Specialist
    May 5, 2020 | 01:44 p.m.

    Thank you for your questions Patti. This curriculum is the foundation of a vocational course offered to youth within the facility. The curriculum is paired with several other existing resources including, skill assessments from the Arizona Career Information System (AZCIS; https://portal.azcis.intocareers.org/) and Arizona's Career Readiness Credential (ACRC; https://acrc.az.gov). The Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections operates a fully accredited school so students earn both course credit and an ACRC certificate. 

    Our team works in conjunction with ADJC teachers, parole officers, and outside partners (employers, DES, Goodwill Industries) to provide transition services pre- and post-release, including resume development, interviewing skills, and assistance with school enrollment.  Job fairs will be included in Phase II. 

  • Icon for: Patti Curtis

    Patti Curtis

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 01:33 p.m.

    Here is the Re-Entry Education site for the US Dept of Education https://cte.ed.gov/initiatives/juvenile-justice-reentry-education-program and the Youth Diversion site https://cte.ed.gov/initiatives/young-adult-diversion-project

    Hopefully, these can be useful to others working in this space.

     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Heather Griller Clark
  • Icon for: Marjorie Bequette

    Marjorie Bequette

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 05:18 p.m.

    Thanks for your video and your work. Where do you see youth values aligning with STEM careers? Where are there challenges? In other youth development program (not with incarcerated youth) I know that's a key element to understand.

  • Icon for: Heather Griller Clark

    Heather Griller Clark

    Lead Presenter
    Principle Research Specialist
    May 5, 2020 | 07:26 p.m.

    Thank you for your question Marjorie.  We've found that incarcerated youth generally lack awareness of and exposure to STEM careers, which is one of the challenges. Another challenge is that this population typically has limited or no job experience. We intend to explore how values incarcerated youth identify differ from those of their non-incarcerated peers. Many of the values embedded in the INSITE course (creativity, problem solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and math/science) are those that are critical in STEM careers.

  • Small default profile

    Helen Griller

    Parent
    May 7, 2020 | 11:41 a.m.

    I vote for this 

  • Small default profile

    Helen Griller

    Parent
    May 7, 2020 | 11:41 a.m.

    I vote for this 

  • Icon for: James Short

    James Short

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 12:07 p.m.

    Thank you for your support Helen!

  • Icon for: Jameela Jafri

    Jameela Jafri

    Facilitator
    May 7, 2020 | 04:36 p.m.

    Working with incarcerated populations is important work. Can you share a little about how you identified the particular topics and/or skills in the app? For example, were they informed by engaging industry? 

  • Icon for: James Short

    James Short

    Co-Presenter
    May 7, 2020 | 05:45 p.m.

    Thanks for the question Jameela. All of the career fields, topics and information has come from our years of work with local employers and workforce development organizations. As part of a previous project we also conducted an "Employer Perceptions" survey that focused on Arizona employers and their perceptions of employing young adults with juvenile justice records. 

  • May 11, 2020 | 12:17 p.m.

    This is wonderful and important work!  I'm curious how certain values align with certain careers.  What are some examples of specific values and the careers with which they align?

  • Icon for: Sarup Mathur

    Sarup Mathur

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2020 | 03:55 p.m.

    Thank you for your post. You have raised a great question Isabel. 

    Students in this project engage in the process of exploration/instruction of values as they discuss personal values (honesty, relationships, success). They learn how values reflect what is important in life, and how that relates to work. In this curriculum, they are provided with various opportunities to reflect on questions like, why do people work?  What are some of the personal values they bring to work?  How do personal values align with work values?

    By engaging in several activities, students identify their personal values through various activities. Then they engage in the discussion of how group values are created – first in a classroom – then in a workplace. 

    Once personal values are identified, we guide students to use this self-knowledge to help make decisions about what job or career they would like to pursue. They learn how they can align their values with work values and gain greater motivation, work satisfaction, life happiness.

    We emphasize that students explore jobs they might not know about as they think about making this connection and finding a work environment that enables them to live their values.

     I hope this is helpful.

  • May 11, 2020 | 04:19 p.m.

    Thank you so much for explaining more about how values relate to students' work. I think values exercises are so important, and I'm glad these students will have the opportunity to use that as a jumping off point for exploring new potential fields of interest.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.