1. Jaymee Nanasi Davis
  2. Research Coordinator
  3. Examining the Impact of an Industry-aligned, STEM Problem Based Learning Curriculum on Native Hawaiian and Underrepresented Youth Workforce Development
  4. University of Hawaii Maui College
  1. Thomas Blamey
  2. STEM Faculty
  3. Examining the Impact of an Industry-aligned, STEM Problem Based Learning Curriculum on Native Hawaiian and Underrepresented Youth Workforce Development
  4. University of Hawaii Maui College
  1. Melissa Bonnion
  2. Examining the Impact of an Industry-aligned, STEM Problem Based Learning Curriculum on Native Hawaiian and Underrepresented Youth Workforce Development
  3. University of Hawaii Maui College
  1. Nahid Nariman
  2. Project STEMulate Researcher
  3. Examining the Impact of an Industry-aligned, STEM Problem Based Learning Curriculum on Native Hawaiian and Underrepresented Youth Workforce Development
  4. TIDES
  1. Michelle Phillips
  2. Examining the Impact of an Industry-aligned, STEM Problem Based Learning Curriculum on Native Hawaiian and Underrepresented Youth Workforce Development
  3. University of Hawaii Maui College
  1. Jana Wilkinson
  2. Director of Upward Bound
  3. Examining the Impact of an Industry-aligned, STEM Problem Based Learning Curriculum on Native Hawaiian and Underrepresented Youth Workforce Development
  4. University of Hawaii Maui College
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Lead Presenter
    Research Coordinator
    May 4, 2020 | 07:49 p.m.

    Aloha mai kakou (Greeting to all of you)!  Thank you for visiting and "talking-stories" with us. This video specifically focuses on Project STEMulate’s industry-aligned, technology-rich Problem-based Learning (PBL) curriculum designed ignite STEM interest in Native Hawaiians and other underrepresented, low-income, potential first-generation-to-college high school students.  The STEMulate model also includes: 1) PBL professional development course to train instructors; and 2) working with local STEM Industry Partners who have provide real-world open-ended problems and served as professional mentors.  We’ve tailored our curriculum to work into the Upward Bound 6-week summer program.  As we approach our final year of funding, we’re seeking your advice on:

    • How is or what about Project STEMulate do you find particularly useful for your work?
    • After viewing the video, what resonates with you about Project STEMulate and/or students?
    • Are the other programs, projects, or research efforts that we should check out or work with? Or specific programs that could benefit from the STEMulate curriculum and/or model?
    • Please feel free to leave questions or suggestions
     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kristin Flaming
  • Icon for: Sandra Larios

    Sandra Larios

    Graduate Student
    May 5, 2020 | 10:04 p.m.

    Thank you lots for sharing this amazing video - I really enjoyed the students being at the forefront of this work. I do have a question about the extent that cultural based pedagogy is involved in this work. The students shared their experiences and shared how they learned about the history of water and places (to name a couple), but wanted to learn more about how you incorporate culture into the STEMulate program. How often are community members involved in teaching and sharing knowledge with the students, how about family members? Again, thank you for sharing this wonderful video! 

  • Icon for: Michelle Phillips

    Michelle Phillips

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 08:47 p.m.

    Hi Sandra! Thanks so much for this important questions! It's actually involved in many aspects of the program, from the college content (incorporating different ways of knowing and both Western and Indigenous science and scientific methods), and many of our community partners and presenters for our "authentic learning experiences" (field trips to special sites to work with community members and organizations to learn about what these organizations do) are also culturally based. Students have several of these experiences throughout the 6-week program (up to 2-3 per week) as they work on their problem. We don't involve family members as much - although they are welcome and invited to the presentations. However, it's something we should definitely consider incorporating for the future - thanks for the great question and ideas!

  • May 7, 2020 | 09:23 p.m.

    In the Great Lakes, our problem is not so much "water shortage" (in fact our lakes are at a record high), but water pollution.  A big problem (and even in the enormous Pacific you have this) is plastics contamination.  Unsightly, and genuinely dangerous for fish, turtles, etc.  Our project has spawned a number of video outputs, like this one encouraging students to make a video about plastic pollution:  https://www.biaquariumstem.org/uploads/1/0/6/4/106486701/nsfgrantvideo.mp4

    We've also had algae bloom problems:  A couple of years ago the Toledo city drinking water plant had to be shut down due to microcystis blooms poisoning the water!

  • Icon for: Michael Haney

    Michael Haney

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 11:45 a.m.

    Wow, really nice video.  The students presented very well and clearly show that they understand the process of research.  They are enthusiastic about being involved in problem based learning when it deals with community issues.  Very nicely done.  The various locations and facilities they visited clearly were important to their work.  

    When the project funding is done, will it be sustained by the schools and community?  Is there commitment to this type of collaborations? Will the university continue to offer this professional development or include it in their teacher training?

    Will you produce materials that can be shared broadly, such as your professional development course and videos such as the one you show here?

  • Icon for: Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Lead Presenter
    Research Coordinator
    May 5, 2020 | 09:25 p.m.

    Aloha Michael!  Thanks for visiting our video presentation.  We appreciate your questions and feedback.  Nahid, our researcher, has answered your questions below.  I wanted to add that we are developing a website that will house materials developed through this project.  The Upward Bound programs that we currently working with are interested utilizing project materials beyond the grant end.  

    We're not too sure how the professional development will evolve beyond the grant funding cycle.  Seems like your interested in the professional development training course... Just curious, do you think this is a need to teacher training program around Problem-based Learning? Is there anything particular you suggest?

  • Icon for: Michael Haney

    Michael Haney

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 09:47 p.m.

    Ideally, professional develop is intended to update the skills or content knowledge of teachers.  So recent college graduates of teacher education programs should certainly have a strong foundation in problem based learning, but I doubt they would be versed in how to use community resources as you have done.  Good teacher mentors or master teachers could fill the gap.  Resource materials of examples, lesson and background materials help. If the accepted curriculum demands this type of teaching, my experience is teachers will respond.  Teacher development programs might be the most efficient way to implement such changes, but they also so costly that they are unsustainable.  I assume most of your teachers are trained locally. 

  • Icon for: Thomas Blamey

    Thomas Blamey

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 10:30 p.m.

    Mahalos for your thoughts Michael.

    Facing the largest challenge the world population might have ever seen seems like perfect direction on how valuable PBL skills will be as we face our future.

  • Icon for: Nahid Nariman

    Nahid Nariman

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 01:03 p.m.

    Michael,

    Thank you for your feedback. The Upper Bound program goal is to provide engaging learning environment for students where they are assured to learn new skills, especially 21st century skills and are enticed to think and explore options for their future careers. The directors of the programs are very interested in being able to provide the same learning opportunity for the students after the funding is done. I will leave it to them to discuss it in more details.

    Regarding sharing the professional development, curriculum, the videos, etc., I should say that currently various options are being reviewed on how to best share these valued resources with other similar organizations.

  • Icon for: James Vonesh

    James Vonesh

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 06:07 p.m.

    I concur - a very nice video! I really enjoyed seeing the students in the field. Could you share a bit more about the role of the field experiences to the project overall? What barriers did you meet to getting students in the field? What were the students' impressions of these experiences/aspect of the project?

     

  • Icon for: Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Lead Presenter
    Research Coordinator
    May 5, 2020 | 09:37 p.m.

    Aloha James, Thanks for stopping by!  Field experiences are a crucial role in the project.  We call them Authentic Learning Experiences (ALE), these are opportunities where students get to learn in the moment, engage in active learning and can take place in the field, lab, guest speaker or hands on experiments.  These ALE are by far the students favorite part of the course.  They LOVE going out into the field and working with mentors.  

    It's difficult to schedule and plan these ALE... we want students involved in the investigation and identifying places to go but timing is an issue... especially when it comes to the procurement process.   

    This year is going to be super interesting as 'stay at home orders' have forced to deliver the course through an online distance learning format.  We're exploring ways students can still have these ALE and do field work in their homes, yards, and places in walking distance. 

    Do you have experience with high school students doing field work?  Any challenges or advice??  

  • Icon for: Leigh Peake

    Leigh Peake

    Informal Educator
    May 5, 2020 | 06:57 p.m.

    Double concur (with James and Michael)! I have so many questions! I will focus on two: 1) I'm curious about the nature of industry involvement -- our educational work has numerous direct ties to the fishing industry in Maine but we've hesitate to place too many demands on them to support students' investigations; and 2) I had a hard time getting a sense of the scale of this project -- at first I thought it was small but then the scenes of field work seemed to show a LOT of students! Looking forward to all I can learn from this discussion thread!

  • Icon for: Melissa Bonnin

    Melissa Bonnin

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 10:24 p.m.

    Aloha Leigh!  Thanks for your comment and questions.  It sounds like we have some similarities (remote areas, yet STEM industry/impacts).  We ask various potential partners each year.  While on one hand it is a big ask, we try to help address real-world issues for the industry/STEM Partner.  Some of our best partners have been either small organizations who can use the information provided (such as our Ko'ie'ie Fishpond with questions about improving the health of the fishponds with a watershed holistic view) to private companies that have a mission to provide educational outreach/benefit the communities (such as related to renewable energy), to research projects with a mission to serve the community state (such as an NSF EPSCoR project).  For partners who don't have a lot of time to give, they may just provide the initial problem, some guidance near the end, and then serve as a judge/give feedback to the student groups.  The teachers are then able to facilitate guest speakers and site visits (such as take water samples).  It really has varied each year at each site.

    As for the scope, we serve three sites on three islands in Hawaii, with an intent that each site might enroll up to 25 students.  

     

    Thanks again for the comments and questions!  We are here to answer more if you have them.

  • Icon for: Michael Haney

    Michael Haney

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 11:13 a.m.

    Many years ago when I was a principal of a STEM high school, I needed partners to work with each of the seniors who were required to do a year of self-directed research.  I found that government agencies, particularly those with STEM research agenda, were more than willing.  In fact, they had a requirement in their funding to spend a small percentage on outreach (disseminating their research).  They were very enthused about taking on high school students and mentoring them in their project work.  Of course, this took a lot of monitoring and we assigned a teacher full time to supervising this effort (it was more than a full load for her and counted as HS credit for the students), but it was enormously successful.  Do you have access to and do you use Federal facilities?  Would they make good partners as you expand to other schools and communities?

  • Icon for: Thomas Blamey

    Thomas Blamey

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 03:25 p.m.

    Concur Michael...the earliest we can get in there with our future generations the better ;0

    I believe the answer to your question is yes, I think this summer the "Big Island" team is working with national telescope crew.

    Again - much thanks for your thoughts and questions.

    Tom

     
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    Michael Haney
  • Icon for: Rebecca Vieyra

    Rebecca Vieyra

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 08:20 p.m.

    Dear Jaymee and Team,

    I love seeing these kinds of real-world-entrenched activities, as they make memories for the long-term.

    Seeing as the goal of this program is "learning 21st century skills" (as described by Nahid), I'm curious to know how you are capturing that growth in individual students, as well as the overall impact of the project, which certainly has ecological/community benefits as well! What kinds of metrics are you using? Do you yet have any specific results to report? (And if so, please do share!)

  • Icon for: Nahid Nariman

    Nahid Nariman

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 12:23 p.m.

    Dear Rebecca,

    Thank you for visiting our video and for your feedback. 

    In the pre- and post-survey students had an opportunity to rate their skills. Also, these data were validated with responses to the focus group questions and confirmed through students’ final project and presentations. Qualitative analysis of the data, for example, revealed problem-solving to be the most exciting aspect of the program. In their papers and presentations, problems were clearly stated, and their discussions divulged critical thinking as they engaged with those problems by analyzing their data, exploring complexities and limitations, and proposing thoughtful solutions. Many students made comments similar to the last one above, reflecting their engagement with group collaboration—another important 21st century skill.

     
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    Holly Morin
  • Icon for: Rebecca Vieyra

    Rebecca Vieyra

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 03:37 p.m.

    Dear Nahid,

    Thank you! I also love, as many others have said, that this is a "place-based" program. Has the program shared out how these projects have directly benefitted the environment as well?

  • Icon for: Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Lead Presenter
    Research Coordinator
    May 6, 2020 | 07:18 p.m.

    Aloha Rebecca, 

    Thought I would jump in :) 

    We're still thinking about and in search of opportunities to disseminate our work.  Although, we haven't specifically thought about sharing out how student or their projects directly benefit the environment because it's not one of research questions. 

    Student interest in their community and environment seems to be an emerging benefit, that we hadn't originally intended to research.   Thanks for pointing that out!

  • Icon for: Jonathan Margolin

    Jonathan Margolin

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 08:23 p.m.

    Dear Jaymee and Nahid, what resonated with me about Project STEMulate is the level of engagement of the students. That came through clearly through the video. I realize that place-based learning and PBL go so nicely together. I was wondering, what sort of metrics are you tracking related to continued student engagement in STEM fields? I feel this is very exciting work and important to the field of STEM education.  

     
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    Holly Morin
  • Icon for: Thomas Blamey

    Thomas Blamey

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 03:25 p.m.

    Hi Jonathan,

    Yes...the "place based" education can be such an advantage in engaging our students.  Hawaii is in the forefront in the in language and STEM - UH Manoa has a Graduate Certificate program in Ethno-Mathematics that is contributing to the future instructors here in this direction.

    https://coe.hawaii.edu/ethnomath/

  • Icon for: Michelle Phillips

    Michelle Phillips

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 04:29 p.m.

    Yes! Thanks Tom for sharing the UHM Ethnomathematics program. Jonathon (and Rebecca) - this is a program to train educators (and future educators) of STEM-related subjects to develop skills and background in teaching through a place-based, inclusive, and culturally-sustaining pedagogical practices. Through Project STEMulate, we incorporate many of these same principles.

  • Icon for: Nahid Nariman

    Nahid Nariman

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 12:19 p.m.

    Thank you Jonathan for your feedback. Yes, this is an exciting project as you see first-hand how excited the students get in working on their real-world industry-aligned problem that as you said engages them in not only PBL, but also place-based learning as well. We have adopted few scales to measure students level of engagement and interest in the STEM fields. Also, we are hoping to be able to collect longitudinal data on their future college and career plans.

     
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    Holly Morin
  • Icon for: Scott Balicki

    Scott Balicki

    K-12 Teacher
    May 6, 2020 | 03:06 p.m.

    Fantastic video Jaymee and Nahid.  I love how students are at the forefront of designing solutions to local problems.  I was wondering whether the high school students reached out to middle school students to engage younger students in the project?  Thanks for sharing!

  • Icon for: Nahid Nariman

    Nahid Nariman

    Co-Presenter
    May 6, 2020 | 03:19 p.m.

    Dear Scott,

    Thank you for visiting our video and your feedback.

    As for students reaching out to the middle school students, it has not been in our formal agenda. However, in Year 2 of the project, we heard from students that they have been wanting to join this program as they have heard from their siblings or friends. Therefore, unofficially I can say that I believe the informal and word of the mouth has increased other students interest in this program. 

  • Icon for: Scott Balicki

    Scott Balicki

    K-12 Teacher
    May 6, 2020 | 03:34 p.m.

    That is great to hear Nahid.  Thanks for the quick response.

  • Icon for: Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Lead Presenter
    Research Coordinator
    May 6, 2020 | 07:24 p.m.

    Hey Scott, 

    Just joining the conversation :) 

    This is actually a great idea!   This is our 3rd year of running this curriculum, and some of the sites that host the course are saying that older students don't want to repeat the course.  So maybe one possibility would be to have repeat students or older students work out with younger/first year students.

    Although, one aspect of the curriculum is that students work in collaborative small groups of 3-5. These groups are mixed aged... so a senior in high school could potentially be in a group with an incoming freshmen.  

  • Icon for: Thomas Blamey

    Thomas Blamey

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 02:00 p.m.

    Great thoughts Scott...

    We currently work with local Upward Bound HS students:

    http://maui.hawaii.edu/upward/

    But we do have a middle school program that would likely be a perfect population to target (Nasi?):

    http://maui.hawaii.edu/gearup/

  • May 7, 2020 | 09:18 p.m.

    A great curriculum centered around Problem-Based Learning providing very rich, real-world contexts for both teachers and students!  Great to see such application.  Can you expound on your underlying theoretical model? Research questions? for Teacher Learning? Student Learning?  Above, it was mentioned that the PBL seemed to be the most exciting part.  Are there mechanisms within the PBL that seem more crucial? What attributes of PBL does your team hypothesize as effectuating successful outcomes?

  • Icon for: Nahid Nariman

    Nahid Nariman

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 12:25 p.m.

    Hi Michael,

    Thank you for visiting our video and for your feedback. As you have observed this project is very rich and helps students to learn and find solutions to a real-world problem through hands-on PBL approach. This project is guided by social constructionism theory and situated learning theory both of which undergird PBL. Few of the research questions we are exploring are: How Does this project benefit low-income and/or Native Hawaiian students in learning of science; how is students’ competency (e.g. knowledge, skills), motivation and persistence to join the STEM-related workforce supported through participation in this project? Or, can this project effectively engage teachers in guiding students?

  • Icon for: Thomas Blamey

    Thomas Blamey

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 02:00 p.m.

    Great questions Michael...in my short 3 years of being a STEM faculty participant in the DOE instructor education (STEMulate)...I have seen much progress and excitement.  I feel many STEM DOE teachers are looking for such help - proud to be a part of this venture.

    Guides on the Side!

  • Icon for: Laura Cisneros

    Laura Cisneros

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 8, 2020 | 09:21 a.m.

    Great work! I'm very interested as it shares some commonalities with our work as well. One aspect that I love about this effort is the engagement of a number of community partners that impart cultural wisdom on the issue the students are undertaking. I'm wondering how do you go about partnering and collaborating with these community partners and if the students have a role in forging these partnerships and development of their project?

  • Icon for: Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Lead Presenter
    Research Coordinator
    May 8, 2020 | 09:37 p.m.

    Hi Laura, 

    I answered Hiller's question before you... and you many find my answer to her insightful. 

    As I ponder your question, I'm beginning to realize that the STEM Parterns we've had over the past 3 years are like any other social network.  We started with people we knew and affiliated with the university.  We started the relationship with our STEM partners from year 1 and 2 when we were writing our grant, pitching our program, and searching for letters of commitment.  In year 3, one of our guest speakers from year 2 got a new job and wanted to work with us... so that was kinda cool! 

    The students haven't had a role in identifying the partnerships.  But their motivation and interest does play a part in keeping the STEM Partner engaged and dedicated to the project.  I do like your suggestion to have students a part of identifying and forging partnerships with the STEM Partner. Thanks!   

  • Icon for: Hiller Spires

    Hiller Spires

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 8, 2020 | 04:18 p.m.

    The level of interest, engagement, and excitement shared by the students in this video is what most resonated with me. I am also greatly inspired by how you leverage partnerships with industry and community organizations. Is the vision with Project STEMulate to engage in differing culturally-relevant STEM challenges in upcoming courses or will water continue to be the focus? 

  • Icon for: Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Jaymee Nanasi Davis

    Lead Presenter
    Research Coordinator
    May 8, 2020 | 09:12 p.m.

    Aloha Hiller!  Thank you for checking us out :) 

    In the current model and structure of Project STEMulate, the idea is that the problem changes each year.  Things have evolved so much since we started!!

    To be honest when we first got the grant, there was a need to hit the ground running!  The STEMulate core staff found STEM Partners and worked on developing the problem out for students to work on.  This happened across 3 Upward Bound sites on 3 different islands with 3 different STEM Partners/Problems across the State of Hawaii. In year 2, we approached 'Ike Wai (featured in this video) an NSF EPSCOR program who was able to pose the same problem to all 3 of our sites because they were on all 3 islands.  We integrated the STEM Partner into our Training Course with instructors and they were able to construct the problem statement for students to work on.  After year 2, our Upward Bound partners wanted to identify their own STEM Partner/problem.  One of the lessons we've learned is that our Upward Bound programs as well as the instructors we hire to facilitate the course want some autonomy in choosing STEM Partner and developing the problem.  We've worked on and continue to iterate around this need for autonomy with the Upward Bound programs and instructors while still meeting the necessary timelines for  implementation of the course in the summer.  Its a real balancing act.  Maybe you've experienced this as you implement your project... with schools and teachers?

    As far as making the STEM problems culturally-relevant, it's kinda been a by product.  We've asked the STEM Partner and instructors to infuse Hawaiian culture... to have students take on a Hawaiian worldview as a lens when looking at the problem and exploring solutions.  But nothing more deliberate than that.  Maybe it's the STEM Partners that have been selected?  

    In the future, especially as we plan on scaling up, I'm thinking (and our evaluator has actually suggested) that we may need to focus on one problem... at least for the first year we work with a program that wants to utilize our course curriculum.  

    Any thoughts or suggestions??

    Thanks for posing the question... it's really made me think.

  • Icon for: Hiller Spires

    Hiller Spires

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 12, 2020 | 09:15 a.m.

    Hi Jaymee!

    The autonomy balancing act :) Yes, we're definitely experiencing this with our work.

    One way that we're hoping to do this better during year 2 of our project is by being clearer with our partners what the hallmarks of Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global -- our inquiry process -- are and then working with teachers during the planning phase to co-construct the negotiable/flexible aspects of the project.

    One of the cornerstones of PBI Global is that there is a thematic UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) focus, e.g, SDG 6 -- ensure access to clean water and adequate sanitation and that each student team's inquiry question must relate to this focus. However, each student team typically develops their own question, so that gives students a level of autonomy within the frame of water and sanitation. 

    We're also figuring out how to broaden our PBI Global instructional materials for multiple SDGs while also improving what we have for PBI Globals in which we've already engaged. In terms of scalability and with respect to the manpower of our small team, we've decided to focus on creating robust instructional materials for three SDGs and to continue to test and improve these materials for the medium-term (at least the next year). We're hoping that this will result in high quality and usable instructional materials while also providing a few thematic focus options for our teacher partners.

  • Icon for: Thomas Blamey

    Thomas Blamey

    Co-Presenter
    May 9, 2020 | 12:02 a.m.

    As Nasi (Jaymee) has mentioned EPSCOR has been involved on the NSF side.  Talk is actually been to move to the Data Science side in the coming year.  Here is a link to EPSCOR Data side...The word is University of Hawaii President Lassner is excited about where this might take us.

    http://www.hawaii.edu/epscor/data-resources/

    Hawaii would like to diversify it business sector and Data Science is one of those areas that has promise.

  • Icon for: Viviana Vazquez

    Viviana Vazquez

    May 12, 2020 | 07:41 p.m.

    This is a great project and I love how engaged all of the students seem to be. I love the fact that students take initiative for their own research and apply their knowledge to real-world problems. It is important for students to see the real world applications to the things they learn in school, and this is a great example of that. Thank you for sharing this video!

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