1. Amy Wagler
  2. Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
  1. Karina Banuelos
  2. Noyce scholar
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
  1. Zoe Covernali
  2. Noyce Scholar
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
  1. Mariah La Rosa
  2. Noyce Scholar
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
  1. Erika Mein
  2. Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies and Educator Preparation
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
  1. Jeffrey Olimpo
  2. Assistant Professor
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
  1. Nora Paugh
  2. Adjunct Professor
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
  1. Francesca Pulisci
  2. Noyce Scholar
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
  1. Katrina Villalobos
  2. Noyce Scholar
  3. The El Paso Partnership for the Preparation of STEM Teachers to Implement Project-based Learning
  4. https://www.utep.edu/science/noyce/
  5. University of Texas at El Paso
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Kate Goss

    Kate Goss

    K-12 Teacher
    May 4, 2020 | 09:58 a.m.

    This is such inspiring work, well planned and with clear empowerment and joy in the work. Thanks so much for sharing this!

     
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    Janelle Johnson
    Katrina Villalobos
    Nora Paugh
    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 4, 2020 | 10:18 a.m.

    Thank you for viewing our video and for the kind words. I am so proud of these young women and the work they are committed to in this project. I am blessed to work with such inspiring young adults!

     
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    Sasha Palmquist
    Janelle Johnson
    Bonny Ortiz-Andrade
    Nora Paugh
    Kate Goss
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 4, 2020 | 10:22 a.m.

    Welcome to our video and thank you for taking the time to visit our project. This project is in the first year of implementation. We are just beginning data collection and PBL project development. This video was directed and produced by primarily five Noyce scholars at UTEP who are listed as co-presenters for this video. I am very proud of their contributions and look forward to seeing the work they do in this project!

    We welcome input about the video and any ideas you have for collaboration! We are focusing the students on developing PBL units that can be implemented in diverse dual-language settings. We emphasize a connection to the community and the significance of the products. Alongside the PBL unit development, we will start collection data on the scholars themselves next Fall in order to study the role of a professional network in professional development as a preservice STEM teachers transitions to an inservice practitioner. Thank you again for your comments and contributions!

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Sasha Palmquist
    Janelle Johnson
    Rachel Navarro
    Nora Paugh
  • Icon for: Liz Diaz- Vazquez

    Liz Diaz- Vazquez

    Researcher
    May 4, 2020 | 05:53 p.m.

    Congratulations for this excellent initiative!  Cheers for more initiatives like this that promote Latinas in STEAM disciplines!

     
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    Janelle Johnson
    Katrina Villalobos
    Nora Paugh
  • Icon for: Jack Broering

    Jack Broering

    Program Coordinator
    May 5, 2020 | 08:01 a.m.

    I loved the enthusiasm of those in your video.  It did a great job summarizing your work..

    A similar program at the University of Cincinnati provided training to teachers on Challenge Based Learning (similar to PBL).  What may be of interest to you is the free units of instruction that were developed and tested by teachers in their classrooms.  You can find these units of instruction at http://stemucationacademy.com/units/.  We also offer training to teachers on the CBL methods as well and as such we might learn something from each other.  A book about this project was written "Creating Engineering Design Challenges, Success Stories for Teachers" from NSTA press that summarizes some of the success achieved by this program.

    Your program looks to be a great asset to the community.  Keep up the good work.

     
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    Sasha Palmquist
    Nora Paugh
    Katrina Villalobos
    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 5, 2020 | 10:04 a.m.

    Thank you Jack for watching and the great feedback! I will be checking out your video and resources today. I think sharing our resources is a great idea and thanks again. We will keep in touch!

  • Icon for: Leslie Koren

    Leslie Koren

    Assistant Professor of Media Arts
    May 5, 2020 | 08:38 a.m.

    Thanks for sharing!

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Nora Paugh

    Nora Paugh

    Co-Presenter
    May 5, 2020 | 01:56 p.m.

    Jack, thank you for sharing information on Challenge Based Learning!

  • Small default profile

    Sylvia Olivas

    Parent
    May 5, 2020 | 01:59 p.m.

    As a parent of one of your Noyce scholars, Katrina Villalobos, I am so very proud of all of the hard work that has been put into this project. I have seen first hand the extreme effort and dedication put forth into her studies and this project. I look forward to seeing the culmination of everyone's hard work. I am so very proud of all our Noyce scholars. Thank you Dr. Nagler for your guidance.

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Sasha Palmquist
    Amy Wagler
    Nora Paugh
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 5, 2020 | 11:00 p.m.

    Thank you Sylvia. I have enjoyed getting to know Katrina - she is wonderful and inspiring young woman! Thank you for your support and encouragement!

  • Icon for: Overtoun Jenda

    Overtoun Jenda

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 05:05 p.m.

    This is wonderful and much needed work that you are doing. How are the Noyce scholars recruited? And where are they going to be placed upon graduation hopefully continuing with PBL?

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 5, 2020 | 11:02 p.m.

    We recruit current STEM majors (math, physics, biology, chemistry, geology) and have student ambassadors to help with the recruitment. All of the scholars commit to two years of teaching in a high needs school district for each year of support. In El Paso, that includes every school district in the region, so almost all stay in the area! Thank you for viewing and for the good questions!

     
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    Sasha Palmquist
  • May 5, 2020 | 06:39 p.m.

    We agree: the best investment and the biggest impact is providing a supportive network for teachers.  In Detroit, our impact is most clearly expressed by the enthusiasm of our fifth grade teachers in our professional development activities.  A question:  how well does what you do with teachers align with the curriculum that their districts program them to teach?  That has been a challenge in our project.  Like El Paso, Detroit is on a river that is also the international border.  Our education site is on Belle Isle in the Detroit River, a few hundred yards from the international boundary.  We focus a lot in our project on what's IN the river. How about yours?

     
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    Mariana Enriquez
    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 5, 2020 | 11:06 p.m.

    Hi Jeffrey, We are working with schools that have already adopted the PBL framework promoted by the New Tech Network. If the Noyce scholars get a job in one of these schools (which is planned) then they will be teaching the PBL framework they have learned. That is so interesting that you focus a lot of the projects on the river. I think that is such a great idea! We have a natural wetlands area (Rio Bosque) that I need to look into. I know a field biologist that works out there and should connect more of the projects in the future too. We could compare notes, but I suspect both have a lot of pollutants!

     

    Thanks for viewing and I will check out your video too!

     
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    Sasha Palmquist
  • May 6, 2020 | 11:37 a.m.

    I really like your project, and the video. What type of data are you collecting as part of the evaluation? This project is very unique, it will be a great contribution to the field. 

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 6, 2020 | 03:03 p.m.

    Thank you for your comment and for watching! We are collecting information on the Noyce scholars in three areas: retention in STEM teaching, affective measures (self-efficacy, teaching identity, etc...) and information on their professional support network. The data collection is starting up this summer for both. Using this data, we will be learning more about how social networks or relationships can either enhance or detract from the quality of pre-service teacher training. In order to understand these social relationships, a social network analysis [SNA] will be conducted to assess the network structure of Noyce Scholars and evaluate how this network affects their teacher development and retention. 

    I saw your presentation (I think we met too?) at the Noyce Summitt and I'd love to learn more about your projects! Will watch your (multiple) videos :)!

     
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    Michael I. Swart
    Sasha Palmquist
  • May 6, 2020 | 02:43 p.m.

    I love the video. I especially loved hearing the voices of the Noyce scholars.

    You mentioned "We are focusing the students on developing PBL units that can be implemented in diverse dual-language settings. We emphasize a connection to the community and the significance of the products." I am wondering, what resources are you drawing upon during this curriculum development process? When you are done, how will you be sharing the curriculum resources that you develop? I ask because I think this would be a very valuable contribution for those of us who are doing similar work in other school districts.   

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 6, 2020 | 03:09 p.m.

    Hi William-thanks for the great questions! We are coordinating the development of these PBL units with primarily one school (Young Women's STEAM Research Academy-an all girls school in EPISD). The students wanted to focus on childhood obesity this year for research projects and though we encountered a little set back, we are hoping to work over the summer to virtually implement the units and then publish the finalized units in the Fall. We are also coordinating with another project at UTEP to build a program centered are Research and Teaching Integration. This will bring together research track students with teaching track students (all STEM) to collaborate on turning research experiences into PBL units for secondary level students. We are hoping to get this into an online virtual case study resource within a couple years. Just starting the course now and we hope the case study book will begin in the next year. When we get things ready for public consumption, we will let send out info!

    Thanks again for watching and let me know if you have any other questions!

  • Icon for: Aramati Casper

    Aramati Casper

    Researcher
    May 6, 2020 | 03:28 p.m.

    Your video conveys your project and everyone's enthusiasm very well! How are you focusing your approach to PBL development? Do you have specific content areas you are starting in and expanding from there, or taking a different approach?

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Sasha Palmquist

    Sasha Palmquist

    Facilitator
    May 6, 2020 | 10:54 p.m.

    I will echo many of the comments above, this is very inspiring work and I especially liked hearing the voices of the scholars! In a future set of videos, it might be interesting to have each of these five women craft a video of their own that follows their individual point of view on the program. Just some food for thought :-) 

    And now my question - picking up on Aramati's question, how will your shift to online and virtual resource development influence the content areas that you will focus on in the coming months?

     
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    Amy Wagler
    Jeanne Reis
  • Icon for: Bonnie Hall

    Bonnie Hall

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 7, 2020 | 05:30 p.m.

    This is an inspiring project!  And as a user of PBL and TBL in the college classroom, excited to see your approach. Childhood obesity will be a rich topic for your summer work, and I think the suggestion above about individual follow up videos would be very interesting!

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 11, 2020 | 10:39 a.m.

    Hello all! thanks again for the great comments and quesitons!

    In response to Aramati, Sasha and Bonnie's questions, I will add the following.

    We are pulling heavily from the New Tech Network framework for PBL instruction and will be using their resources to guide the PBL development: https://newtechnetwork.org/resources/.

     

    I love the individual video follow up idea and will bring this up to the Noyce scholars and see what they think-thank you!

    With regard to online and virtual resources, we are just starting to figure this out. We will be continuing with the childhood obesity theme. What we have going for us is a substantial data set and lots of community partners who have an interest in this topic. As we get the units together and since these will be student-directed, I will have to report back how exactly we adapt to the online setting. I am relatively unsophisticated, I teach a flipped classroom for my college classes with screencast videos. However, that is all I have to offer at this point!

     

    thanks again! Amy

  • May 7, 2020 | 04:50 p.m.

    This is wonderful, and I echo what others have said about how wonderful it was to hear from the Noyce Scholars (and the children!)  Are teachers working at all with ideas or frameworks from the literature culturally relevant pedagogy or critical pedagogy?  

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 11, 2020 | 10:43 a.m.

    Hi Isabel and thank you for the question! We need to engage the teachers more with this. We had plans late March to do just that, but obviously were unable. I am planning to touch base with the high school faculty soon so that we can start figuring out how to engage them, particularly for creating a culturally relevant pedagogy. I will say that one thing unique about our students at UTEP and these Noyce scholars, is that they are regional students who came from the exact educational system they will be implementing these PBL units and teaching. This is perhaps unique since they are immersed in the culture. This is why I am careful to let the scholars guide so much of what we do! thanks again!

  • May 11, 2020 | 01:15 p.m.

    That makes complete sense! (COVID sure did throw a wrench in a lot of plans).  But it's so wonderful that you have regional students who are "experts" in this system and can bring their knowledge and understanding to the wonderful work you do.

  • May 11, 2020 | 01:16 p.m.

    If you do end up eventually engaging with this, I'd love to hear what particular frameworks/readings/etc you end up using.

  • Icon for: Jeanne Reis

    Jeanne Reis

    Facilitator
    May 8, 2020 | 05:12 p.m.

    I'm picking up on the thread started by William above, because my thinking went into high gear when I read that quote "We are focusing the students on developing PBL units that can be implemented in diverse dual-language settings. We emphasize a connection to the community and the significance of the products." 

    This got me thinking about the fact that lexicons of world languages vary from one to the next, but some are further apart than others. Are you finding that the academic lexicon of the languages spoken by teachers and students in this project differ substantially from English? If so, how is that impacting dual-language instruction, development of materials, or otherwise being addressed in the project?

    I'm also curious about cultural differences in teaching and learning within the community, and how the values of the community are being factored into the design of the program. This type of project offers opportunities to take a fresh look at established practices and ask whether they apply, make sense or can be improved in response to the ways students and teachers engage and contribute. The learning goes in all directions, in my experience. :)

    Thank you for sharing this wonderful project! 

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 11, 2020 | 10:52 a.m.

    Hello Jeanne and thank you for watching and the great comments!

    See my post right above to fill in some blanks, but yes, there are some differences in the academic lexicon between teachers and students. The district (EPISD) has dual-language instruction at most campuses (English Spanish). It is not a traditional English focused proficiency curriculum, but it focuses on developing the academic lexicon of students in both English and Spanish. Students from this program graduate with dual-language honors at graduation. In a PBL context, we are just starting to delve into the impact of dual language instruction and it will be a product of this project to understand more. If you email me, I can provide references for some regional work done on supporting dual-language students in math and statistics settings, but we will broaden this for STEM instruction.

    With regard to the community aspect, in many ways the values of our community are organically built into the program. We have a closed loop educational system (partly due to our geographical isolation) so that almost all teachers, the Noyce scholars, UTEP students are all products of the educational systems in which they serve. The schools we are partnering with have existing community connections that we will build upon and hopefully form new relationships with other partners. Hope that helps and thanks!

  • May 8, 2020 | 07:32 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing.  Definitely agree with others that it terrific to hear from the Noyce Scholars and the children. My wife is originally from El Paso so I have visited several times.

    I am curious if you have any expected outcomes based on a social network analysis?

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 11, 2020 | 10:56 a.m.

    Hi-tell her hello from El Paso! I love meeting people from El Paso when I travel!

    With regard to your question, we are pursuing three classes of hypotheses for the SNA: (1) that inclusion in the Noyce@UTEP program will enhance the formation of network structure (relationships) for STEM teaching as evidenced by Noyce- enabled network associations; (2) that full development of the network structure positively influences the major program outcomes (motivation, teaching self-efficacy, retention); and (3) that Noyce Scholars who are retained in teaching will exhibit homophily in the network. 

  • Icon for: Eric Hamilton

    Eric Hamilton

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2020 | 01:07 p.m.

    Amy, we are looking at working closely with schools in San Antonio and partners in Mexico.  This is great work.  If there might be ways to connect efforts, that would be great, but either way, very excited for this work.

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 12, 2020 | 12:00 p.m.

    Yes, we should being neighbors! Checking out your video now! you can email me anytime at awagler2@utep.edu

  • Icon for: Bonny Ortiz-Andrade

    Bonny Ortiz-Andrade

    Lecturer
    May 11, 2020 | 02:16 p.m.

    Excellent work. Congrats!

     

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 12, 2020 | 12:04 p.m.

    thank you - congrats on your video too!

     

    Yours happened to be the very first one I watched at the start of the showcase and it is still one of my favorites! Wonderful work you are doing at your outstanding university!

     
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    Bonny Ortiz-Andrade
  • Icon for: Amanda Gunning

    Amanda Gunning

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 11, 2020 | 04:03 p.m.

    Thank you for this moving video about a critical issue. I love how your project is targeting expansion of Hispanic women in STEM teaching - this approach will support increasing the number of students interested and achieving in STEM. The inclusion of PBL in this project is important to note, as well, as an emphasis on critical thinking.

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 12, 2020 | 12:07 p.m.

    Thank you for viewing and leaving a comment! I will just say that our students are so innovative and energized to impact their students that they are a joy to work with. I count myself very lucky. thanks again.

  • May 12, 2020 | 01:33 p.m.

    Great to see evidence-based PD.  Noyce seems to have potential to be implemented at other institutions.  Are there plans to package and export such a program beyond El Paso? 

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 12, 2020 | 04:34 p.m.

    Yes, we are just starting out, so none yet, but we will. I think we will showcase that in another year's video. I hope it will be of interest!

  • Icon for: Viviana Vazquez

    Viviana Vazquez

    May 12, 2020 | 03:51 p.m.

    Love this intitative! It is always great to see more Latinas enter the STEM field. Thank you for sharing!

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 12, 2020 | 04:35 p.m.

    thank you for visiting Viviana!

  • Icon for: Mariana Enriquez

    Mariana Enriquez

    Researcher
    May 12, 2020 | 04:10 p.m.

    What a great program! Congratulations!
    I love programs that focus on minority communities, especially young Latinas because they have so much to offer. 
    In general, this program is similar to another one being showcased here, "A community-based Approach to Engaging Students and Teachers," lead by Dr. Janelle Johnson.
    Keep up the great work!

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 12, 2020 | 04:35 p.m.

    thank you - will check this out!

  • Small default profile

    Cathy Law

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 12, 2020 | 05:36 p.m.

    Wonderful work everyone!

     
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    Amy Wagler
  • Icon for: Amy Wagler

    Amy Wagler

    Lead Presenter
    Associate Chair of Mathematical Sciences
    May 12, 2020 | 07:54 p.m.

    Thank you all for your participation and support. Looking forward to seeing you next year!

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.