1. Rita Karl
  2. http://national.tpt.org/about/who-we-are/
  3. Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
  4. Code: SciGirls! Media to Engage Girls in Computing Pathways
  5. http://www.scigirlsconnect.org/
  6. Twin Cities PBS
  1. Angie Prindle
  2. Series Producer, SciGirls
  3. Code: SciGirls! Media to Engage Girls in Computing Pathways
  4. http://www.scigirlsconnect.org/
  5. Twin Cities PBS
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 4, 2020 | 01:51 p.m.

    Welcome to the fifth season of SciGirls! This project is designed to increase the number of girls in computer science and coding using gender equitable and culturally responsive teaching strategies. In addition to the new coding-focused episodes on PBS Kids, SciGirls offers activities aligned with national standards and with the SciGirls Strategies, a set of research-based strategies funded by the NSF that have been proven to address barriers to STEM learning by girls, including the lack of diverse role models. Technology-aligned activities can be found on SciGirlsCONNECT.org, a website for educators that feature chaptered SciGirls videos, equity-focused strategies, and STEM + technology-focused activities. Over the next year, outreach efforts will include implementing coding-based programs for girls at 12 educational partner sites across the nation using the new resources, and includes a summative evaluation on the implementation of activities and strategies. In addition, we will complete a research study on the impact of narrative transport and character identification on girls’ interest in coding and pursuing other coding opportunities by watching the new episodes and playing the new game, CODE QUEST .

     
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    Lisa Ristuccia
    Leslie Koren
    Michael Horn
  • Icon for: Sarah Young

    Sarah Young

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 11:59 a.m.

    This is outstanding. I appreciate that you are building strong self-image related to STEM for young girls. 

    I am interested in learn more about your partner sites for the upcoming year. Are they traditional schools or informal education sites or both? I am interested to hear more details. 

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 5, 2020 | 12:17 p.m.

    Thank you for your question! We have a dozen educational partners who will be conducting Code: SciGirls outreach programs. They include a wide range of types of groups who will conduct afterschool programs and summer camps with girls in ten states.

    They include two schools (who run afterschool programs), three universities (who run outreach programs), a PBS station, a science museum, two laboratories (who run outreach programs) and three community organizations including, Girls Scouts, Girls, Inc, and Community Code. 

    For more information on the national SciGirls CONNECT program, click here for our 2018-2019 Annual Report. The list of all 200+ SciGirls partners can be found here.

     
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    Lisa Ristuccia
  • Icon for: Sarah Young

    Sarah Young

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 12:19 p.m.

    I appreciate the diversity of your implementation sites. This makes for robust research and outcomes that truly help to advance the field for computer science and broadening participation. Thank you for the follow up link. 

  • Icon for: Leslie Koren

    Leslie Koren

    Assistant Professor of Media Arts
    May 5, 2020 | 08:54 a.m.

    Great topic! Thank you for this important work. 

  • Icon for: Liz Diaz- Vazquez

    Liz Diaz- Vazquez

    Researcher
    May 5, 2020 | 12:13 p.m.

    Excellent and inspiring initiative! At the University of Puerto Rico we are working in the development of initiatives to promote the participation of young girls, we will love to join efforts with your project!

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 5, 2020 | 12:33 p.m.

    Liz,

    Good to hear from you! All SciGirls resources are free and in English and Spanish, you can find them on SciGirls CONNECT. 

    We have worked with Dr. Sandra Cruz-Pol, Professor Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez on our Emmy Award-nominated episode, Asombrosos Arboles (Terrific Trees).

    Our entire fourth season was filmed primarily in Spanish. The episodes are available also in one playlist here that includes the six episodes and 12 short-form videos of Latina STEM professionals.

    Research and evaluation reports on the family and girl-focused Latina SciGirls program can be found on informalscience.org.  

    An exerpt from the final research study states: 

    Girls reported higher rates of emotional connection after exposure to the media-enhanced outreach program featuring family involvement and visits by in person Latina STEM role models. Emotional connection is an important component of STEM-related identity development, and one that is often a challenge to impact positively in formal education settings. The informal education Latina SciGirls programs seem to have performed better in this regard. Younger girls In particular (4th and 5th graders) reported significantly higher rates of both emotional connection and personal relevance to STEM after participating in a Latina SciGirls program. The influence of mothers in particular seem to make the difference between girls successfully navigating the default tension between gender identity and STEM identity prevalent in Latinx culture (and most other cultures).  It may be the case that parent involvement and influence is more pronounced in the type of informal STEM learning that Latina SciGirls generated than in formal education where parent roles are more restrictive.  

     

  • Icon for: Jennifer Vermillion

    Jennifer Vermillion

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 01:53 p.m.

    This is inspiring work!  I appreciate your focus on culturally responsive practices to empower girls. Will your upcoming efforts with your educational partners focus on the middle school level? 

     
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    Catherine Stimac
  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 5, 2020 | 05:49 p.m.

    Hi Jennifer,

    Yes, SciGirls' outreach programs are (traditionally) for 5-8th graders. We have a very diverse group of partners with many of them working with non-white populations. We have worked with partners who use our materials with even younger (3-4th graders). One of the interesting things about some of our recent research is that the youngest girls (as noted above) seem to have the biggest changes in their identity after participation. Likely due to stereotypes being so prevalent in our society.

     

     
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    Lisa Ristuccia
  • Icon for: Janice Cuny

    Janice Cuny

    Facilitator
    May 5, 2020 | 04:15 p.m.

    I too like the culturally relevant piece. I find that sometimes people have a hard time imagining what these practices might look like in a classroom. Can you give some examples?

  • Icon for: Leslie Koren

    Leslie Koren

    Assistant Professor of Media Arts
    May 5, 2020 | 05:57 p.m.

    Hi there, this is such important work. Thank you for applying your resources to this topic. Our topic is about multivariable calculus learning and led by a female mathematician, but does not directly deal with inclusivity in such an acute way. Thank you!

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 5, 2020 | 06:00 p.m.

    Absolutely Janice!

    The new SciGirls Strategies (just republished in 2019 after an NSF-funded literature review) has a strong focus on an overarching framework of cultural responsive practices and the design of an inclusive and welcoming learning environment. We also have a short video for educators on culturally responsive teaching here.

    The link below goes straight to that part of the guide that includes an overview of culturally responsive teaching and specific tips on how to become more culturally responsive!

    Download the Framework for the SciGirls Strategies: STEM for All Learning Environment and Culturally Responsive Practices

    A few tips include:

    Understand your own culture and how it affects others. Engage in self-reflection regarding how your values, attitudes, experiences, and social context shapes your instruction and how it might be improved.

    Get to know your youth and build on their life experiences. Provide opportunities for youth to share their interests and personal experiences and connect them to STEM.

    Embrace participants’ home language. Validate youth’s bilingual abilities to leverage learning and make youth feel welcome and accepted.

     
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    CarlaDean Caldera
    Lisa Ristuccia
    Leslie Koren
  • Icon for: Leslie Koren

    Leslie Koren

    Assistant Professor of Media Arts
    May 5, 2020 | 06:07 p.m.

    Have you seen any feedback or outcomes with these Vimeo links for culturally responsive teaching? I will be sharing these with my Media Arts groups as well!

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 5, 2020 | 06:16 p.m.

    The SciGirls Snapshots (videos) were produced just prior to the updating of the SciGirls Strategies. They cover a variety of topics, including culturally responsive teaching. We have used them with high school educators in Minnesota who are learning research-based strategies to recruit and retain more girls in STEM and CTE courses. Feel free to share!

    In addition, SciGirls' Cultural Diversity Consultant, Dr. Alicia Santiago recently wrote this blog for NSTA, Equity in STEM Education: It's all about culture!  "A way for educators to span the cultural divide between them and their students is to build bridges using culturally responsive practices and creating inclusive learning environments. Educators who approach science teaching and learning with a culturally responsive pedagogy (CRP) are effective in bridging that cultural divide."

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Lisa Ristuccia
  • Icon for: Brian Kruse

    Brian Kruse

    Director, Teacher Learning Center
    May 7, 2020 | 11:13 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing!  One of our team members (Theresa) attended a SciGirls training a couple of years ago.  Her experience helped us as we developed our own project, to help ensure a more equitable experience for all learners.  The use of story in learning, and motivating students with experiences that add to the stories they are building about their own lives is so important.

  • Icon for: Angie Prindle

    Angie Prindle

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 05:43 p.m.

    Thank you, Brian! We're so glad Theresa found the SciGirls training experience a valuable one. Thanks for your commitment to fostering equitable learning experiences! It's thrilling to see youth develop meaningful connections to their learning experiences and weave those into their story and identity. How great to have allies connected around the power of storytelling; I'm looking forward to checking out your video too!

  • Icon for: Marley Jarvis

    Marley Jarvis

    Outreach and Education Specialist
    May 7, 2020 | 08:26 p.m.

    Thanks for continuing with the great work! I hope you have a chance to check out the video I made on some of our work on increasing girls' engagement with STEM and countering negative biases like "math is for boys." SciGirls rocks!

  • Icon for: Angie Prindle

    Angie Prindle

    Co-Presenter
    May 8, 2020 | 05:46 p.m.

    Thanks, Marley! I love the topic of your video and I'm excited to check it out. So glad to find alignment in our missions! 

  • Icon for: Lisa Ristuccia

    Lisa Ristuccia

    K-12 Teacher
    May 10, 2020 | 01:58 a.m.

    I love SciGirls! I did the SciGirls facilitator training a couple years ago. I would love to get reconnected now that I have switched organizations (from OdySea Aquarium to the SciTech Institute).

    I am very impressed with the detailed lesson plans, STEM mentors, and showing how everyday girls can use STEM in their lives.

  • Icon for: Angie Prindle

    Angie Prindle

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2020 | 12:46 p.m.

    Hi Lisa, and so great to hear from you! Hope all is going well for you at the SciTech institute. We'd love to reconnect anytime! 

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 11, 2020 | 12:58 p.m.

    Hi Lisa! So good to hear from you. Please reach out to Niki Becker, SciGirls STEM Specialist, and let her know of your availability as a trainer. So great about your new job! Email: nbecker@tpt.org.

  • Icon for: CarlaDean Caldera

    CarlaDean Caldera

    Informal Educator
    May 11, 2020 | 04:01 p.m.

     Hi Rita & team, Your videos are wonderful. Culturally responsive teaching is most vital in our world today. I love watching SciGirls, your work is exceptional! Thank you for sharing. CarlaDean

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 11, 2020 | 04:39 p.m.

    Thank you CarlaDean! We work hard to ensure that all our media engages a diverse audience as we have found that if girls watching see girls and women in STEM who look like them, they provide personal sources of inspiration, underscoring the idea that if girls can see it, they can be it.

  • Icon for: Suzanna Rose

    Suzanna Rose

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 12, 2020 | 09:14 a.m.

    Your video was inspiring. I work only at the university level trying to improve STEM faculty's attitudes towards girls/women but was gratified to see the confidence you are building in the girls that will enable them to persist in science. 

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 12, 2020 | 05:53 p.m.

    Thank you Suzanna,

    Data shows that stereotypes are formed very early on (as you likely know) and so by being on PBS Kids, we can ensure that even the littlest viewers can see girls doing STEM, solving problems, working together and having fun!

  • May 12, 2020 | 05:41 p.m.

    Great work and fantastic job bringing so many resources together.  Conservation work, game dev, data science and STEM justice with coding and the arts.  

    Can you expound on the types of data and the content of the data that comes out of this work? Learning? Skillsets? Motivations? Interests? Perspectives?

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Lead Presenter
    Senior Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 12, 2020 | 06:01 p.m.

    Thank you Michael--

    We will complete a research study on the impact of narrative transport and character identification on girls’ interest in coding and pursuing other coding opportunities by watching the new episodes and playing the new game, CODE QUEST

    Narrative transportation theory proposes that audiences engaging with a narrative format modify their interests, beliefs, and intentions in response to the information, claims, or events presented depending on how strongly involved they are in the story and its characters. In addition to the psychological experience of feeling transported into a story world, identification with characters has a distinct role in narrative persuasion and behavioral change. Those who identify with a character are more likely to adopt character interests, beliefs and behaviors.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.